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Was die in der KategorieENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
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English - Etymology

From Middle English _that_, from Old English _þæt_ (“the, that”, neuter definite article and relative pronoun), from Proto-Germanic _*þat_. Compare Saterland Frisian _dät_, West Frisian _dat_, Dutch _dat_, Low German _dat_, German _dass_ and _das_, Danish _det_, Swedish _det_, Icelandic _það_.

From Middle English that, from Old English þæt (the, that, neuter definite article and relative pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *þat. Compare Saterland Frisian dät, West Frisian dat, Dutch dat, Low German dat, German dass and das, Danish det, Swedish det, Icelandic það.

Was die in der KategorieENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* (stressed) enPR: _th_ăt, IPA(key): /ðæt/ * Rhymes: -æt * (unstressed) enPR: _th_ət, IPA(key): /ðət/

Was die in der KategorieENGLISH - CONJUNCTION
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English - Conjunction

THAT * Introducing a clause that is the subject or object of a verb (such as one involving reported speech), or that is a complement to a previous statement. _He told me THAT the book is a good read._ _I believe THAT it is true._ — _She is convinced THAT he is British._ * Introducing a subordinate clause expressing a reason or cause: because, in that. _Be glad THAT you have enough to eat._ * (now uncommon) Introducing a subordinate clause expressing an aim, purpose, or goal: so, so that. * 1714, Alexander Pope, _The Rape of the Lock_, III.1: The hungry judges soon the sentence sign, and wretches hang THAT jurymen may dine. * 1833, _Parley's Magazine_, volume 1, page 23: Ellen's mamma was going out to pay a visit, but she left the children a large piece of rich plumcake to divide between them, THAT they might play at making feasts. * 2009, Dallas R. Burdette, _Biblical Preaching and Teaching_ (ISBN 1615790853), page 340: Jesus died THAT we might live "through" Him. * Introducing — especially, but not exclusively, with an antecedent like _so_ or _such_ — a subordinate clause expressing a result, consequence, or effect. _The noise was so loud THAT she woke up._ _The problem was sufficiently important THAT it had to be addressed._ * 2008, Zoe Williams, _The Guardian_, 23 May 2008: My dad apparently always said that no child of his would ever be harassed for its poor eating habits, and then I arrived, and I was so disgusting THAT he revised his opinion. * (archaic or poetic) Introducing a premise or supposition for consideration: seeing as; inasmuch as; given that; as would appear from the fact that. * 1623, William Shakespeare, _The Comedy of Errors_: What, are you mad, THAT you do reason so? * 1859, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities: In short, the period was so far like the present period, THAT some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. * _c._ 1911, D.H. Lawrence, third draft of what became _Sons and Lovers_, in Helen Baron (editor), _Paul Morel_, Cambridge University Press (2003), ISBN 978-0-521-56009-2, page 234: “She must be wonderfully fascinating,” said Mrs Morel, with scathing satire. “She must be very wonderful, THAT you should trail eight miles, backward and forward, after eight o’clock at night.” * Introducing a subordinate clause modifying an adverb. _Was John there? — Not THAT I saw._ — — — _How often did she visit him? — Twice THAT I saw._ * 1866 October 6, Anthony Trollope, _The Claverings_, part 8, in _Littell's Living Age_, number 1166 (series 4, number 27), page 27: " […] I will go anywhere THAT she may wish if she will go with me," * Introducing an exclamation expressing a desire or wish. * 1864, T. S. Norgate's translation of the _Iliad_, book 10, page 613: "Would THAT my rage and wrath would somehow stir me, / Here as I am, to cut off thy raw flesh / And eat it." * 1892, Paolo Segneri, _The Manna of the Soul: Meditations for Each Day of the Year_: "Oh, THAT they would be wise, and would understand, […] " * Introducing an exclamation expressing a strong emotion such as sadness or surprise. * 1610, William Shakespeare, _The Tempest_, act 1, scene 2, page 4: I pray thee, mark me — THAT a brother should / Be so perfidious! — USAGE NOTES * _That_ can be used to introduce subordinate clauses, but can just as easily be omitted: one can say either "he told me THAT it's a good read" (in which case the second clause is a "_that_ clause") or "he told me it's a good read" (in which case the second clause is a "bare clause"). * Historically, "that" was usually preceded by

that

  1. Introducing a clause that is the subject or object of a verb (such as one involving reported speech), or that is a complement to a previous statement.
    He told me that the book is a good read.
    I believe that it is true.She is convinced that he is British.
  2. Introducing a subordinate clause expressing a reason or cause: because, in that.
    Be glad that you have enough to eat.
  3. (now uncommon) Introducing a subordinate clause expressing an aim, purpose, or goal: so, so that.
  4. Introducingespecially, but not exclusively, with an antecedent like so or sucha subordinate clause expressing a result, consequence, or effect.
    The noise was so loud that she woke up.
    The problem was sufficiently important that it had to be addressed.
  5. (archaic or poetic) Introducing a premise or supposition for consideration: seeing as; inasmuch as; given that; as would appear from the fact that.
  6. Introducing a subordinate clause modifying an adverb.
    Was John there? — Not that I saw. — — — How often did she visit him? — Twice that I saw.
  7. Introducing an exclamation expressing a desire or wish.
  8. Introducing an exclamation expressing a strong emotion such as sadness or surprise.

Usage notes

English - Determiner

THAT (_plural_ THOSE) * The (thing, person, idea, etc) indicated or understood from context, especially if more remote physically, temporally or mentally than one designated as "this", or if expressing distinction. _THAT book is a good read. This one isn't._ _THAT battle was in 1450._ _THAT cat of yours is evil._ DERIVED TERMS * thatness * this, that, and the other TRANSLATIONS

that (plural those)

  1. The (thing, person, idea, etc) indicated or understood from context, especially if more remote physically, temporally or mentally than one designated as "this", or if expressing distinction.
    That book is a good read. This one isn't.
    That battle was in 1450.
    That cat of yours is evil.

Derived terms

Translations

Was die in der KategorieENGLISH - PRONOUN
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English - Pronoun

THAT * (demonstrative) The thing, person, idea, quality, event, action, or time indicated or understood from context, especially if more remote geographically, temporally or mentally than one designated as "this", or if expressing distinction. [from 9thc.] * _c._ 1600, William Shakespeare, _The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark_, Act 3, Scene 1: To be, or not to be: THAT is the question: / Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer / The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, / Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, / And by opposing end them? * 1888 July, _The Original Secession Magazine_, page 766: [He] was qualified and fitted, both intellectually and morally, — and THAT to an exceptional extent — to be the Head […] * 1909, Archibald Marshall, _The Squire's Daughter_, chapterII: "I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. I never did THAT. I always made up my mind I'd be a big man some day, and—I'm glad I didn't steal." * 1990, Peter Hopkirk, _The Great Game_ (Folio Society 2010), page 310: However […], the British were unable to do much about it short of going to war with St Petersburg, and THAT the government was unwilling to do. * 2005, Joey Comeau, _Lockpick Pornography_ (Loose Teeth Press): I've never seen someone beaten unconscious before. THAT’s lesbians for you. _He went home, and after THAT I never saw him again._ * (demonstrative) The aforementioned quality; used together with a verb and pronoun to emphatically repeat a previous statement. _The water is so cold! — THAT it is._ * 1910, Helen Granville-Barker, _An Apprentice to Truth_, page 214: "She is very honourable," said Mrs. Thompson, solemnly. "Yes, one sees she is THAT, and so simple-minded." * (relative) Which, who. [from 9thc.] _the CPR course THAT she took really came in handy_ * _c._ 1600, William Shakespeare, _Hamlet_, act 1, scene 4: By heaven, I'll make a ghost of him THAT lets me. USAGE NOTES * Some authorities prescribe that _that_ should only be used in restrictive contexts (where the relative clause is part of the identification of the noun phrase) and _which_ or _who_/_whom_ should be used in non-restrictive contexts; in other words, they prescribe "I like the last song on the album, which John wrote". In practice, both _that_ and _which_ are found in both contexts. * In a restrictive relative clause, _that_ is never used as the object of a preposition unless the preposition occurs at the end of the clause; _which_ is used instead. Hence "this is the car I spoke of" can be rendered as "this is the car _that_ I spoke of" or "this is the car of which I spoke", but not as *"this is the car of _that_ I spoke." * _That_ refers primarily to people or things; _which_ refers primarily to things, and _who_ refers primarily to people. Some authorities insist _who_/_whom_ be used when making reference to people, but others, such as the _Merriam-Webster_ dictionary, write that such prescriptions are "without foundation" and use of _that_ in such positions is common and "entirely standard". Hence, one sees both "he is the man who invented the telephone" and "he is the man that invented the telephone." * When _that_ (or another relative pronoun, like _who_ or _which_) is used as the subject of a relative clause, the verb agrees with the antecedent of the pronoun. Thus "The thing that is...", "The things that are...", etc. * In the past, bare _that_ could be used, with the meaning "the thing, person, etc indicated", where modern English requires _that which_ or _what_. Hence the King James translation of John 3:11 is "We speak _that_ we do

that

  1. (demonstrative) The thing, person, idea, quality, event, action, or time indicated or understood from context, especially if more remote geographically, temporally or mentally than one designated as "this", or if expressing distinction. [from 9thc.]
    He went home, and after that I never saw him again.
  2. (demonstrative) The aforementioned quality; used together with a verb and pronoun to emphatically repeat a previous statement.
    The water is so cold! — That it is.
  3. (relative) Which, who. [from 9thc.]
    the CPR course that she took really came in handy

Usage notes

English - Adverb

THAT (_not comparable_) * (degree) To a given extent or degree. _"The ribbon was THAT thin." "I disagree, I say it was not THAT thin, it was thicker... or maybe thinner..."_ * (degree) To a great extent or degree; very, particularly (in negative constructions). _I'm just not THAT sick._ _I did the run last year, and it wasn't THAT difficult._ * (obsolete outside dialects) To such an extent; so, such. (in positive constructions). _Ooh, I was THAT happy I nearly kissed her._ * 1693, John Hacket, _Scrinia reserata: a Memorial offered to the great Deservings of John Williams_ (_Archbishop Williams_): This was carried with THAT little noise that for a good space the vigilant Bishop was not awak'd with it. TRANSLATIONS

that (not comparable)

  1. (degree) To a given extent or degree.
    "The ribbon was that thin." "I disagree, I say it was not that thin, it was thicker... or maybe thinner..."
  2. (degree) To a great extent or degree; very, particularly (in negative constructions).
    I'm just not that sick.
    I did the run last year, and it wasn't that difficult.
  3. (obsolete outside dialects) To such an extent; so, such. (in positive constructions).
    Ooh, I was that happy I nearly kissed her.

Translations

Was die in der KategorieENGLISH - NOUN
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English - Noun

THAT (_plural_ THATS) * (philosophy) Something being indicated that is there; one of those. * 1998, David L. Hall, Roger T. Ames, _Thinking from the Han_, page 247: As such, they do not have the ontological weight of "Being" and "Not-being," but serve simply as an explanatory vocabulary necessary to describe our world of thises and THATS.

that (plural thats)

  1. (philosophy) Something being indicated that is there; one of those.

Was die in der KategorieENGLISH - SEE ALSO
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English - See Also

* which

Was die in der KategorieENGLISH - REFERENCES
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English - References

* ^ _The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia_ (1903) * ↑ 2.0 2.1 “that” in _Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary,_ Merriam-Webster Online

  1. ^ The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia (1903)
  2. 2.0 2.1 “that” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online

Was die in der KategorieGERMAN - VERB
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German - Verb

THAT * First-person singular preterite of _thun_. * Third-person singular preterite of _thun_.

that

  1. First-person singular preterite of thun.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of thun.

Was die in der KategorieOLD DUTCH - ETYMOLOGY
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Old Dutch - Etymology

From Proto-Germanic _*þat_.

From Proto-Germanic *þat.

Was die in der KategorieOLD DUTCH - PRONOUN
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Old Dutch - Pronoun

THAT n * that, that one

that n

  1. that, that one

Was die in der KategorieOLD DUTCH - DETERMINER
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Old Dutch - Determiner

THAT n * that DESCENDANTS * Middle Dutch: dat * Dutch: dat

that n

  1. that

Descendants

Was die in der KategorieOLD SAXON - ETYMOLOGY
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Old Saxon - Etymology

From Proto-Germanic _*þat_.

From Proto-Germanic *þat.

Was die in der KategorieOLD SAXON - DETERMINER
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Old Saxon - Determiner

THAT * Nominative and accusative singular neuter form of thē DESCENDANTS * Low German: dat

that

  1. Nominative and accusative singular neuter form of thē

Descendants


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