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Tiene 4 cartas ( p a s s )         1 vocales ( a )         3 consonantes ( p s s )         Palabra por el contrario ssap

¿Qué la en categoríaENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* (UK) IPA(key): /pɑːs/, /pæs/ * (US) IPA(key): /pæs/ * Rhymes: -æs, -ɑːs

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɑːs/, /pæs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /pæs/
  • Rhymes: -æs, -ɑːs

¿Qué la en categoríaENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _pas_, _pase_, _pace_, from _passen_ (“to pass”). See the verb section, below. NOUN PASS (_plural_ PASSES) * An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier such as a mountain range; a passageway; a defile; a ford. _a mountain PASS_ * (Can we date this quote?) Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: "Try not the PASS!" the old man said. * A single movement, especially of a hand, at, over, or along anything. * 1921, John Griffin, "Trailing the Grizzly in Oregon", in _Forest and Stream_, pages 389-391 and 421-424, republished by Jeanette Prodgers in 1997 in _The Only Good Bear is a Dead Bear_, page 35: [The bear] made a PASS at the dog, but he swung out and above him [...] * A single passage of a tool over something, or of something over a tool. * An attempt. _My PASS at a career of writing proved unsuccessful._ * (fencing) A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary. * (figuratively) A thrust; a sally of wit. * A sexual advance. _The man kicked his friend out of the house after he made a PASS at his wife._ * (sports) The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another. * (rail transport) A passing of two trains in the same direction on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other overtake it. * Permission or license to pass, or to go and come. * (Can we date this quote?) James Kent: A ship sailing under the flag and PASS of an enemy. * A document granting permission to pass or to go and come; a passport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission; as, a railroad or theater pass; a military pass. * (baseball) An intentional walk. _Smith was given a PASS after Jones' double._ * The state of things; condition; predicament; impasse. * 1606 Shakespeare: What, have his daughters brought him to this PASS? * (Can we date this quote?) Robert South: Matters have been brought to this PASS, that, if one among a man's sons had any blemish, he laid him aside for the ministry... * (obsolete) Estimation; character. * (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare: Common speech gives him a worthy PASS. * (obsolete, Chaucer, compare 'passus') A part, a division. * The area in a restaurant kitchen where the finished dishes are passed from the chefs to the waiting staff. SYNONYMS * (opening, road, or track, available for passing): gap * (fencing: thrust or push): thrust * (figurative: a thrust; a sally of wit): * (movement over or along anything): * (movement of a tool over something, or something other a tool): transit * (the state of things): condition, predicament, state * (permission or license to pass, or to go and come): access, admission, entry * (document granting permission to pass or to go and come): * (obsolete: estimation; character): * (obsolete: a part, a division): ANTONYMS * (rail transport): meet DERIVED TERMS TRANSLATIONS

From Middle English pas, pase, pace, from passen (to pass). See the verb section, below.

Noun

pass (plural passes)

  1. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier such as a mountain range; a passageway; a defile; a ford.
    a mountain pass
  2. A single movement, especially of a hand, at, over, or along anything.
  3. A single passage of a tool over something, or of something over a tool.
  4. An attempt.
    My pass at a career of writing proved unsuccessful.
  5. (fencing) A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.
  6. (figuratively) A thrust; a sally of wit.
  7. A sexual advance.
    The man kicked his friend out of the house after he made a pass at his wife.
  8. (sports) The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another.
  9. (rail transport) A passing of two trains in the same direction on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other overtake it.
  10. Permission or license to pass, or to go and come.
  11. A document granting permission to pass or to go and come; a passport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission; as, a railroad or theater pass; a military pass.
  12. (baseball) An intentional walk.
    Smith was given a pass after Jones' double.
  13. The state of things; condition; predicament; impasse.
  14. (obsolete) Estimation; character.
  15. (obsolete, Chaucer, compare 'passus') A part, a division.
  16. The area in a restaurant kitchen where the finished dishes are passed from the chefs to the waiting staff.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

¿Qué la en categoríaENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Información sobre el tema

English - Etymology 2

From Middle English _passen_, from Old French _passer_ (“to step, walk, pass”), from Vulgar Latin *_passāre_ (“step, walk, pass”), from Latin _passus_ (“a step”), _pandere_ (“to spread, unfold, stretch”), from Proto-Indo-European _*patno-_, from Proto-Indo-European _*pete-_ (“to spread, stretch out”). Cognate with Old English _fæþm_ (“armful, fathom”). More at fathom. VERB PASS (_third-person singular simple present_ PASSES, _present participle_ PASSING, _simple past and past participle_ PASSED) * (heading) _Physical movement._ * (intransitive) To move or be moved from one place to another. _They PASSED from room to room._ * (transitive) To go past, by, over, or through; to proceed from one side to the other of; to move past. _You will PASS a house on your right._ * (transitive) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over. _The waiter PASSED biscuits and cheese._ _The torch was PASSED from hand to hand._ * Joseph Addison (1672-1719) I had only time to PASS my eye over the medals. * Edward Hyde Clarendon (1609-1674) Waller PASSED over five thousand horse and foot by Newbridge. * (intransitive, transitive, medicine) To eliminate (something) from the body by natural processes. _He was PASSING blood in both his urine and his stool._ _The poison had been PASSED by the time of the autopsy._ * (transitive, nautical) To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure. * (sports) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force. * (transitive, soccer) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force. * THE GUARDIAN, Rob Smyth, 20 June 2010 Iaquinta PASSES it coolly into the right-hand corner as Paston dives the other way. * (transitive) To move (the ball or puck) to a teammate. * (intransitive, fencing) To make a lunge or swipe. * (intransitive) To go from one person to another. * (transitive) To put in circulation; to give currency to. _PASS counterfeit money_ * (transitive) To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance. _PASS a person into a theater or over a railroad_ * (heading) _To change in state or status, to advance._ * (intransitive) To change from one state to another. _He PASSED from youth into old age._ * (intransitive) To depart, to cease, to come to an end. _At first, she was worried, but that feeling soon PASSED._ * (Can we date this quote?) John Dryden (1631-1700) Beauty is a charm, but soon the charm will PASS. * 1995, Penny Richards, _The Greatest Gift of All_: The crisis PASSED as she'd prayed it would, but it remained to be seen just how much damage had been done. * (intransitive, often with "on" or "away") To die. _His grandmother PASSED yesterday._ _His grandmother PASSED away yesterday._ _His grandmother PASSED on yesterday._ * (intransitive, transitive) To go successfully through (an examination, trail, test, etc.). _He PASSED his examination._ _He attempted the examination, but did not expect to PASS._ * (intransitive, transitive) To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to become valid or effective; to obtain the formal sanction of (a legislative body). _Despite the efforts of the opposition, the bill PASSED._ _The bill PASSED both houses of Congress._ _The bill PASSED the Senate, but did not PASS in the House._ * (intransitive, law) To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance. The estate PASSES

From Middle English passen, from Old French passer (to step, walk, pass), from Vulgar Latin *passāre (step, walk, pass), from Latin passus (a step), pandere (to spread, unfold, stretch), from Proto-Indo-European *patno-, from Proto-Indo-European *pete- (to spread, stretch out). Cognate with Old English fæþm (armful, fathom). More at fathom.

Verb

pass (third-person singular simple present passes, present participle passing, simple past and past participle passed)

  1. (heading) Physical movement.
    1. (intransitive) To move or be moved from one place to another.
      They passed from room to room.
    2. (transitive) To go past, by, over, or through; to proceed from one side to the other of; to move past.
      You will pass a house on your right.
    3. (transitive) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over.
      The waiter passed biscuits and cheese.
      The torch was passed from hand to hand.
    4. (intransitive, transitive, medicine) To eliminate (something) from the body by natural processes.
      He was passing blood in both his urine and his stool.
      The poison had been passed by the time of the autopsy.
    5. (transitive, nautical) To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.
    6. (sports) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force.
      1. (transitive, soccer) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force.
      2. (transitive) To move (the ball or puck) to a teammate.
      3. (intransitive, fencing) To make a lunge or swipe.
    7. (intransitive) To go from one person to another.
    8. (transitive) To put in circulation; to give currency to.
      pass counterfeit money
    9. (transitive) To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance.
      pass a person into a theater or over a railroad
  2. (heading) To change in state or status, to advance.
    1. (intransitive) To change from one state to another.
      He passed from youth into old age.
    2. (intransitive) To depart, to cease, to come to an end.
      At first, she was worried, but that feeling soon passed.
    3. (intransitive, often with "on" or "away") To die.
      His grandmother passed yesterday.
      His grandmother passed away yesterday.
      His grandmother passed on yesterday.
    4. (intransitive, transitive) To go successfully through (an examination, trail, test, etc.).
      He passed his examination.
      He attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass.
    5. (intransitive, transitive) To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to become valid or effective; to obtain the formal sanction of (a legislative body).
      Despite the efforts of the opposition, the bill passed.
      The bill passed both houses of Congress.
      The bill passed the Senate, but did not pass in the House.
    6. (intransitive, law) To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance.
      The estate passes

English - Etymology 3

Short for _password_. NOUN PASS (_plural_ PASSES) * (computing, slang) A password (especially one for a restricted-access website). _Anyone want to trade PASSES?_ TRANSLATIONS

Short for password.

Noun

pass (plural passes)

  1. (computing, slang) A password (especially one for a restricted-access website).
    Anyone want to trade passes?
Translations

¿Qué la en categoríaENGLISH - EXTERNAL LINKS
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English - External Links

* pass in _Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary_, G. & C. Merriam, 1913 * pass in _The Century Dictionary_, The Century Co., New York, 1911 * pass at _OneLook Dictionary Search_

¿Qué la en categoríaENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
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English - Anagrams

* asps * saps * spas

¿Qué la en categoríaFAROESE - PRONUNCIATION
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Faroese - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): [pʰasː]

  • IPA(key): [pʰasː]

¿Qué la en categoríaFAROESE - NOUN
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Faroese - Noun

PASS n (_genitive singular_ PASS_, plural_ PASS) * passport DECLENSION

pass n (genitive singular pass, plural pass)

  1. passport

Declension

¿Qué la en categoríaGERMAN - PRONUNCIATION
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German - Pronunciation

* Rhymes: -as

  • Rhymes: -as

¿Qué la en categoríaGERMAN - VERB
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German - Verb

PASS * Imperative singular of _passen_.

pass

  1. Imperative singular of passen.

¿Qué la en categoríaLOMBARD - PRONUNCIATION
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Lombard - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): [pas]

  • IPA(key): [pas]

¿Qué la en categoríaLOMBARD - NOUN
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Lombard - Noun

PASS ? * step * mountain pass

pass ?

  1. step
  2. mountain pass

¿Qué la en categoríaNORWEGIAN BOKMÅL - NOUN
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Norwegian Bokmål - Noun

PASS n (_definite singular_ PASSET, _indefinite plural_ PASS, _definite plural_ PASSA _or_ PASSENE) * a passport (_travel document_) * a pass (_fjellpass - mountain pass_)

pass n (definite singular passet, indefinite plural pass, definite plural passa or passene)

  1. a passport (travel document)
  2. a pass (fjellpass - mountain pass)

¿Qué la en categoríaNORWEGIAN BOKMÅL - REFERENCES
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Norwegian Bokmål - References

* “pass” in _The Bokmål Dictionary_.

¿Qué la en categoríaNORWEGIAN NYNORSK - NOUN
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Norwegian Nynorsk - Noun

PASS n (_definite singular_ PASSET, _indefinite plural_ PASS, _definite plural_ PASSA) * a passport (_travel document_) * a pass (_mountain pass_)

pass n (definite singular passet, indefinite plural pass, definite plural passa)

  1. a passport (travel document)
  2. a pass (mountain pass)

¿Qué la en categoríaNORWEGIAN NYNORSK - REFERENCES
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Norwegian Nynorsk - References

* “pass” in _The Nynorsk Dictionary_.

¿Qué la en categoríaSWEDISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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Swedish - Etymology 1

From German, originally from Italian passo. NOUN PASS n * passport (document granting permission to pass) * place which you (must) pass or is passing; pass (between mountains) * pace; a kind of gait * place where a hunter hunts; place where a policeman patrols * spell (a period of duty) * leave notice (document granting permission to leave) (from prison) DECLENSION DERIVED TERMS * passa * passlig * till pass SYNONYMS * genomfart, överfart, passage * leave notice: permissionssedel, permissionspass

From German, originally from Italian passo.

Noun

pass n

  1. passport (document granting permission to pass)
  2. place which you (must) pass or is passing; pass (between mountains)
  3. pace; a kind of gait
  4. place where a hunter hunts; place where a policeman patrols
  5. spell (a period of duty)
  6. leave notice (document granting permission to leave) (from prison)
Declension
Derived terms
Synonyms
  • leave notice: permissionssedel, permissionspass

¿Qué la en categoríaSWEDISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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Swedish - Etymology 2

NOUN PASS c * (ball sports) pass; a transfer of the ball from one player to another in the same team DECLENSION DERIVED TERMS SYNONYMS * passning

Noun

pass c

  1. (ball sports) pass; a transfer of the ball from one player to another in the same team
Declension
Derived terms
Synonyms
  • passning


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