Aider le site de continuer à croître, comme notre page fan.

catch   
      

Il a 5 courrier ( c a t c h )         1 voyelles ( a )         4 consonnes ( c t c h )         Parole au contraire hctac

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
Informations sur le sujet

English - Etymology

From Middle English _cacchen_, from Anglo-Norman _cachier_, from Old Northern French, from Late Latin _captiare_, from Latin _captare_. Akin to Modern French _chasser_ (from Old French _chacier_, whence English _chase_), Spanish _cazar_. The verb became irregular, possibly under the influence of the similar meaning _latch_ (from Old English _læċċan_) whose past tense was _lahte_, _lauhte_, _laught_ (Old English _læhte_) until becoming regularised in Modern English.

From Middle English cacchen, from Anglo-Norman cachier, from Old Northern French, from Late Latin captiare, from Latin captare. Akin to Modern French chasser (from Old French chacier, whence English chase), Spanish cazar.

The verb became irregular, possibly under the influence of the similar meaning latch (from Old English læċċan) whose past tense was lahte, lauhte, laught (Old English læhte) until becoming regularised in Modern English.

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
Informations sur le sujet

English - Pronunciation

* enPR: kăch, IPA(key): /kætʃ/, /kɛtʃ/, [ˈkʰæt͡ʃ], [ˈkʰɛt͡ʃ] * Rhymes: -ætʃ, Rhymes: -ɛtʃ The pronunciation /kɛtʃ/ started out as the unstressed variant of /kætʃ/ but has become the stressed pronunciation as well in many dialects.

  • enPR: kăch, IPA(key): /kætʃ/, /kɛtʃ/, [ˈkʰæt͡ʃ], [ˈkʰɛt͡ʃ]
  • Rhymes: -ætʃ, Rhymes: -ɛtʃ

The pronunciation /kɛtʃ/ started out as the unstressed variant of /kætʃ/ but has become the stressed pronunciation as well in many dialects.

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - NOUN
Informations sur le sujet

English - Noun

CATCH (_countable and uncountable_, _plural_ CATCHES) * (countable) The act of seizing or capturing. syn. _The CATCH of the perpetrator was the product of a year of police work._ * (countable) The act of catching an object in motion, especially a ball. syn. transl. _The player made an impressive CATCH._ _Nice CATCH!_ * (countable) The act of noticing, understanding or hearing. syn. transl. _Good CATCH. I never would have remembered that._ * (uncountable) The game of catching a ball. transl. _The kids love to play CATCH._ * (countable) A find, in particular a boyfriend or girlfriend or prospective spouse. syn. transl. _Did you see his latest CATCH?_ _He's a good CATCH._ * (countable) Something which is captured or caught. transl. syn. _The fishermen took pictures of their CATCH._ _The CATCH amounted to five tons of swordfish._ * (countable) A stopping mechanism, especially a clasp which stops something from opening. syn. transl. _She installed a sturdy CATCH to keep her cabinets closed tight._ * (countable) A hesitation in voice, caused by strong emotion. _There was a CATCH in his voice when he spoke his father's name._ * (countable, sometimes noun adjunct) A concealed difficulty, especially in a deal or negotiation. syn. transl. _It sounds like a great idea, but what's the CATCH?_ _Be careful, that's a CATCH question._ * (countable) A crick; a sudden muscle pain during unaccustomed positioning when the muscle is in use. _I bent over to see under the table and got a CATCH in my side._ * (countable) A fragment of music or poetry. syn. * (obsolete) A state of readiness to capture or seize; an ambush. * T. Fuller The common and the canon law […] lie at CATCH, and wait advantages one against another. * (countable, agriculture) A crop which has germinated and begun to grow. * (obsolete) A type of strong boat, usually having two masts; a ketch. * 1612, John Smith, _Map of Virginia_, in Kupperman 1988, p. 158: Fourteene miles Northward from the river Powhatan, is the river Pamaunke, which is navigable 60 or 70 myles, but with CATCHES and small Barkes 30 or 40 myles farther. * (countable, music) A type of humorous round in which the voices gradually catch up with one another; usually sung by men and often having bawdy lyrics. * 1610, _The Tempest_, by Shakespeare, act 3 scene 2 Let us be jocund: will you troll the CATCH / You taught me but while-ere? * (countable, music) The refrain; a line or lines of a song which are repeated from verse to verse. syn. * (countable, cricket, baseball) The act of catching a hit ball before it reaches the ground, resulting in an out. * (countable, cricket) A player in respect of his catching ability; particularly one who catches well. * (countable, rowing) The first contact of an oar with the water. * (countable, phonetics) A stoppage of breath, resembling a slight cough. * Passing opportunities seized; snatches. * John Locke It has been writ by CATCHES with many intervals. * A slight remembrance; a trace. * Glanvill We retain a CATCH of those pretty stories. SYNONYMS * (act of capturing def.): seizure, capture, collar, snatch * (catching a ball def. transl.): grasp, snatch * (act of noticing def. transl.): observation * (a find def. transl.): prize, find; conquest, beau * (quantity captured def.): haul, take * (stopping mechanism def. transl.): stop, chock; clasp, latch * (hidden difficulty def. transl.): snag, problem; trick, gimmick, hitch * (fragment of music

catch (countable and uncountable, plural catches)

  1. (countable) The act of seizing or capturing. syn.
    The catch of the perpetrator was the product of a year of police work.
  2. (countable) The act of catching an object in motion, especially a ball. syn. transl.
    The player made an impressive catch.
    Nice catch!
  3. (countable) The act of noticing, understanding or hearing. syn. transl.
    Good catch. I never would have remembered that.
  4. (uncountable) The game of catching a ball. transl.
    The kids love to play catch.
  5. (countable) A find, in particular a boyfriend or girlfriend or prospective spouse. syn. transl.
    Did you see his latest catch?
    He's a good catch.
  6. (countable) Something which is captured or caught. transl. syn.
    The fishermen took pictures of their catch.
    The catch amounted to five tons of swordfish.
  7. (countable) A stopping mechanism, especially a clasp which stops something from opening. syn. transl.
    She installed a sturdy catch to keep her cabinets closed tight.
  8. (countable) A hesitation in voice, caused by strong emotion.
    There was a catch in his voice when he spoke his father's name.
  9. (countable, sometimes noun adjunct) A concealed difficulty, especially in a deal or negotiation. syn. transl.
    It sounds like a great idea, but what's the catch?
    Be careful, that's a catch question.
  10. (countable) A crick; a sudden muscle pain during unaccustomed positioning when the muscle is in use.
    I bent over to see under the table and got a catch in my side.
  11. (countable) A fragment of music or poetry. syn.
  12. (obsolete) A state of readiness to capture or seize; an ambush.
  13. (countable, agriculture) A crop which has germinated and begun to grow.
  14. (obsolete) A type of strong boat, usually having two masts; a ketch.
  15. (countable, music) A type of humorous round in which the voices gradually catch up with one another; usually sung by men and often having bawdy lyrics.
  16. (countable, music) The refrain; a line or lines of a song which are repeated from verse to verse. syn.
  17. (countable, cricket, baseball) The act of catching a hit ball before it reaches the ground, resulting in an out.
  18. (countable, cricket) A player in respect of his catching ability; particularly one who catches well.
  19. (countable, rowing) The first contact of an oar with the water.
  20. (countable, phonetics) A stoppage of breath, resembling a slight cough.
  21. Passing opportunities seized; snatches.
  22. A slight remembrance; a trace.

Synonyms

English - Verb

CATCH (_third-person singular simple present_ CATCHES, _present participle_ CATCHING, _simple past and past participle_ CAUGHT) * (heading) _To capture, overtake._ * (transitive) To capture or snare (someone or something which would rather escape). syn. [from 13thc.] _I hope I CATCH a fish.  He ran but we CAUGHT him at the exit.  The police CAUGHT the robber at a nearby casino._ * (transitive) To entrap or trip up a person; to deceive. [from 14thc.] * 1611, _Authorized King James Version_, Mark 12:13: And they send unto him certain of the Pharisees and of the Herodians, to CATCH him in his words. * (transitive, figuratively, dated) To marry or enter into a similar relationship with. * 1933, Sinclair Lewis, _Ann Vickers_, p.108: The public […] said that Miss Bogardus was a suffragist because she had never CAUGHT a man; that she wanted something, but it wasn't the vote. * 2006, Michael Collier and Georgia Machemer, _Medea_, p.23: As for Aspasia, concubinage with Pericles brought her as much honor as she could hope to claim in Athens. […] from the moment she CAUGHT her man, this influential, unconventional woman became a lightning rod […]. * (transitive) To reach (someone) with a strike, blow, weapon etc. [from 16thc.] _If he CATCHES you on the chin, you'll be on the mat._ * (transitive) To overtake or catch up to; to be in time for. [from 17thc.] _If you leave now you might CATCH him.  I would love to have dinner but I have to CATCH a plane._ * (transitive) To discover unexpectedly; to surprise (someone doing something). [from 17thc.] _He was CAUGHT on video robbing the bank.  He was CAUGHT in the act of stealing a biscuit._ * (transitive) To travel by means of. [from 19thc.] _CATCH the bus_ * 1987, A.J. Quinnell, _In the Name of the Father_, p.111: After about a kilometer I CAUGHT a taxi to Santa Croce. * (transitive, rare) To become pregnant. (Only in past tense or as participle.) [from 19thc.] * 2002, Orpha Caton, _Shadow on the Creek_, pp.102-103: Had Nancy got CAUGHT with a child? If so she would destroy her parent's dreams for her. * (heading) _To seize hold of._ * (transitive, dated) To grab, seize, take hold of. [from 13thc.] _I CAUGHT her by the arm and turned her to face me._ * 1590, Edmund Spenser, _The Faerie Queene_, III.2: Her aged Nourse, whose name was Glaucè hight, / Feeling her leape out of her loathed nest, / Betwixt her feeble armes her quickly KEIGHT […]. * (transitive) To take or replenish something necessary, such as breath or sleep. [from 14thc.] _I have to stop for a moment and CATCH my breath.  I CAUGHT some Z's on the train._ * (transitive) To grip or entangle. [from 17thc.] _My leg was CAUGHT in a tree-root._ * (intransitive) To be held back or impeded. _Be careful your dress doesn't CATCH on that knob.  His voice CAUGHT when he came to his father's name._ * 1879, Richard Jefferies, _The Amateur Poacher_, chapterII: Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow CAUGHT the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill. * (intransitive) To engage with some mechanism; to stick, to succeed in interacting with something or initiating some process. transl. Push

catch (third-person singular simple present catches, present participle catching, simple past and past participle caught)

  1. (heading) To capture, overtake.
    1. (transitive) To capture or snare (someone or something which would rather escape). syn. [from 13thc.]
      I hope I catch a fish.  He ran but we caught him at the exit.The police caught the robber at a nearby casino.
    2. (transitive) To entrap or trip up a person; to deceive. [from 14thc.]
    3. (transitive, figuratively, dated) To marry or enter into a similar relationship with.
    4. (transitive) To reach (someone) with a strike, blow, weapon etc. [from 16thc.]
      If he catches you on the chin, you'll be on the mat.
    5. (transitive) To overtake or catch up to; to be in time for. [from 17thc.]
      If you leave now you might catch him.  I would love to have dinner but I have to catch a plane.
    6. (transitive) To discover unexpectedly; to surprise (someone doing something). [from 17thc.]
      He was caught on video robbing the bank.  He was caught in the act of stealing a biscuit.
    7. (transitive) To travel by means of. [from 19thc.]
      catch the bus
    8. (transitive, rare) To become pregnant. (Only in past tense or as participle.) [from 19thc.]
  2. (heading) To seize hold of.
    1. (transitive, dated) To grab, seize, take hold of. [from 13thc.]
      I caught her by the arm and turned her to face me.
    2. (transitive) To take or replenish something necessary, such as breath or sleep. [from 14thc.]
      I have to stop for a moment and catch my breath.  I caught some Z's on the train.
    3. (transitive) To grip or entangle. [from 17thc.]
      My leg was caught in a tree-root.
    4. (intransitive) To be held back or impeded.
      Be careful your dress doesn't catch on that knob.  His voice caught when he came to his father's name.
    5. (intransitive) To engage with some mechanism; to stick, to succeed in interacting with something or initiating some process. transl.
      Push

French - Etymology

From English. _This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology._

From English. This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Dont le dans la catégorieFRENCH - NOUN
Informations sur le sujet

French - Noun

CATCH m (_uncountable_) * wrestling; professional wrestling DERIVED TERMS * catcheur

catch m (uncountable)

  1. wrestling; professional wrestling

Derived terms

Dont le dans la catégorieFRENCH - EXTERNAL LINKS
Informations sur le sujet

French - External Links

* “catch” in _le Trésor de la langue française informatisé_ (_The Digitized Treasury of the French Language_).

Rime


comments powered by Disqus

Vidéos similaires

Facebook




[X]

Rencontrer des gens


Pratiquez votre anglais, rencontrer des gens à travers le monde

Trouver