Aider le site de continuer à croître, comme notre page fan.

hold   
      

Il a 4 courrier ( h o l d )         1 voyelles ( o )         3 consonnes ( h l d )         Parole au contraire dloh

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
Informations sur le sujet

English - Pronunciation

* (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hōld, IPA(key): /həʊld/, /hɔʊld/ * (General American) enPR: hōld, IPA(key): /hoʊld/ * (also) IPA(key): /hl̩d/ * Homophone: hulled * Homophone: holed * Rhymes: -əʊld

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
Informations sur le sujet

English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _hold_, _holde_, from Old English _hold_ (“gracious, friendly, kind, favorable, true, faithful, loyal, devout, acceptable, pleasant”), from Proto-Germanic _*hulþaz_ (“favourable, gracious, loyal”), from Proto-Indo-European _*kel-_ (“to tend, incline, bend, tip”). Cognate with German _hold_ (“gracious, friendly, sympathetic, grateful”), Danish and Swedish _huld_ (“fair, kindly, gracious”), Icelandic _hollur_ (“faithful, dedicated, loyal”), German _Huld_ (“grace, favour”). ADJECTIVE HOLD (_comparative_ MORE HOLD, _superlative_ MOST HOLD) * (obsolete) Gracious; friendly; faithful; true.

From Middle English hold, holde, from Old English hold (gracious, friendly, kind, favorable, true, faithful, loyal, devout, acceptable, pleasant), from Proto-Germanic *hulþaz (favourable, gracious, loyal), from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to tend, incline, bend, tip). Cognate with German hold (gracious, friendly, sympathetic, grateful), Danish and Swedish huld (fair, kindly, gracious), Icelandic hollur (faithful, dedicated, loyal), German Huld (grace, favour).

Adjective

hold (comparative more hold, superlative most hold)

  1. (obsolete) Gracious; friendly; faithful; true.

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Informations sur le sujet

English - Etymology 2

From Middle English _holden_, from Old English _healdan_, from Proto-Germanic _*haldaną_ (“to tend, herd”), from Proto-Indo-European _*kel-_ (“to drive”) (compare Latin _celer_ (“quick”), Tocharian B _kälts_ (“to goad, drive”), Ancient Greek _κέλλω_ (kéllō, “to drive”), Sanskrit _kaláyati_ (kaláyati, “he impels”)). Cognate to West Frisian _hâlde_, Low German _holden_, _holen_, Dutch _houden_, German _halten_, Danish _holde_. VERB HOLD (_third-person singular simple present_ HOLDS, _present participle_ HOLDING, _simple past_ HELD, _past participle_ HELD _or_ (archaic) HOLDEN) * (transitive) To grasp or grip. _HOLD the pencil like this._ * 1879, Richard Jefferies, _The Amateur Poacher_, chapter1: But then I had the flintlock by me for protection. ¶ There were giants in the days when that gun was made; for surely no modern mortal could have HELD that mass of metal steady to his shoulder. The linen-press and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window […]. * (transitive) To contain or store. _This package HOLDS six bottles._ * (heading) _To maintain or keep to a position or state._ * (transitive) To have and keep possession of something. _HOLD my coat for me.  The general ordered the colonel to HOLD his position at all costs._ * (transitive) To reserve. _HOLD a table for us at 7:00._ * (transitive) To cause to wait or delay. _HOLD the elevator._ * (transitive) To detain. _HOLD the suspect in this cell._ * (intransitive) To be or remain valid; to apply. _to HOLD true;  to HOLD good_ * John Locke (1632-1705) The rule HOLDS in land as all other commodities. * To keep oneself in a particular state. _to HOLD firm;  to HOLD opinions_ * (transitive) To impose restraint upon; to limit in motion or action; to bind legally or morally; to confine; to restrain. * William Shakespeare (1564-1616) We cannot HOLD mortality's strong hand. * Richard Crashaw (1613-1649) Death! what do'st? O, HOLD thy blow. * Thomas Macaulay (1800-1859) He hath not sufficient judgment and self-command to HOLD his tongue. * (transitive) To bear, carry, or manage. _He HOLDS himself proudly erect.  HOLD your head high._ * William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Let him HOLD his fingers thus. * (intransitive, chiefly imperative) Not to move; to halt; to stop. * William Shakespeare (1564-1616) And damned be him that first cries, "HOLD, enough!" * (intransitive) Not to give way; not to part or become separated; to remain unbroken or unsubdued. * William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Our force by land hath nobly HELD. * To remain continent; to control an excretory bodily function. _to HOLD one's bladder;  to HOLD one's breath_ * (heading) _To maintain or keep to particular opinions, promises, actions._ * (transitive) To maintain, to consider, to opine. * 1776, Thomas Jefferson _et al._, _United States Declaration of Independence_: We HOLD these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. * (transitive) To bind (someone) to a consequence of his or her actions. _He was HELD responsible for the actions of those under his command.  I'll HOLD him to that promise._ * To maintain in being or action; to carry on; to prosecute, as a course of conduct or an argument; to continue; to sustain. * Bible, Psalms lxxxiii.1: HOLD not thy peace, and be not still. * John Milton (1608-1674) Seedtime and harvest, heat and hoary frost, / Shall HOLD their course. * To accept, as an opinion; to be the adherent

From Middle English holden, from Old English healdan, from Proto-Germanic *haldaną (to tend, herd), from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (to drive) (compare Latin celer (quick), Tocharian B kälts (to goad, drive), Ancient Greek κέλλω (kéllō, to drive), Sanskrit kaláyati (kaláyati, he impels)). Cognate to West Frisian hâlde, Low German holden, holen, Dutch houden, German halten, Danish holde.

Verb

hold (third-person singular simple present holds, present participle holding, simple past held, past participle held or (archaic) holden)

  1. (transitive) To grasp or grip.
    Hold the pencil like this.
  2. (transitive) To contain or store.
    This package holds six bottles.
  3. (heading) To maintain or keep to a position or state.
    1. (transitive) To have and keep possession of something.
      Hold my coat for me.  The general ordered the colonel to hold his position at all costs.
    2. (transitive) To reserve.
      Hold a table for us at 7:00.
    3. (transitive) To cause to wait or delay.
      Hold the elevator.
    4. (transitive) To detain.
      Hold the suspect in this cell.
    5. (intransitive) To be or remain valid; to apply.
      to hold true;  to hold good
    6. To keep oneself in a particular state.
      to hold firm;  to hold opinions
    7. (transitive) To impose restraint upon; to limit in motion or action; to bind legally or morally; to confine; to restrain.
    8. (transitive) To bear, carry, or manage.
      He holds himself proudly erect.  Hold your head high.
    9. (intransitive, chiefly imperative) Not to move; to halt; to stop.
    10. (intransitive) Not to give way; not to part or become separated; to remain unbroken or unsubdued.
    11. To remain continent; to control an excretory bodily function.
      to hold one's bladder;  to hold one's breath
  4. (heading) To maintain or keep to particular opinions, promises, actions.
    1. (transitive) To maintain, to consider, to opine.
    2. (transitive) To bind (someone) to a consequence of his or her actions.
      He was held responsible for the actions of those under his command.  I'll hold him to that promise.
    3. To maintain in being or action; to carry on; to prosecute, as a course of conduct or an argument; to continue; to sustain.
    4. To accept, as an opinion; to be the adherent
      Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 3
      Informations sur le sujet

English - Etymology 3

Alteration (due to _hold_) of _hole_. Cognate with Dutch _hol_ (“hole, cave, den, cavity, cargo hold”). NOUN HOLD (_plural_ HOLDS) * (nautical, aviation) The cargo area of a ship or aircraft, (often _cargo hold_). _Put that in the HOLD._ TRANSLATIONS

Alteration (due to hold) of hole. Cognate with Dutch hol (hole, cave, den, cavity, cargo hold).

Noun

hold (plural holds)

  1. (nautical, aviation) The cargo area of a ship or aircraft, (often cargo hold).
    Put that in the hold.
Translations

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
Informations sur le sujet

English - Anagrams

* dhol

Dont le dans la catégorieGERMAN - ETYMOLOGY
Informations sur le sujet

German - Etymology

From Old High German _hold_, from Proto-Germanic _*hulþaz_. Cognates include Gothic

From Old High German hold, from Proto-Germanic *hulþaz. Cognates include Gothic

Dont le dans la catégorieGERMAN - ADJECTIVE
Informations sur le sujet

German - Adjective

HOLD (_comparative_ HOLDER, _superlative_ AM HOLDESTEN) * (archaic, poetic) friendly, comely, graceful * 1907, Carl Spitteler, _Die Mädchenfeinde_, Siebentes Kapitel, Beim Narrenſtudenten * _Um aber auf deinen HOLDEN Kadettengeneral zurückzukommen, ſo will ich dir, weil du mir dein Geheimnis anvertraut haſt, auch etwas Geheimnisvolles verraten […]_ DECLENSION

hold (comparative holder, superlative am holdesten)

  1. (archaic, poetic) friendly, comely, graceful

Declension

Dont le dans la catégorieGERMAN - EXTERNAL LINKS
Informations sur le sujet

German - External Links

* hold in _Duden_ online

Dont le dans la catégorieHUNGARIAN - ETYMOLOGY
Informations sur le sujet

Hungarian - Etymology

From Proto-Uralic _*kuŋe_. Cognates include _hó_ (“month”), Finnish and Estonian _kuu_.

From Proto-Uralic *kuŋe. Cognates include (month), Finnish and Estonian kuu.

Dont le dans la catégorieHUNGARIAN - PRONUNCIATION
Informations sur le sujet

Hungarian - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /ˈhold/

  • IPA(key): /ˈhold/

Dont le dans la catégorieHUNGARIAN - NOUN
Informations sur le sujet

Hungarian - Noun

HOLD (_plural_ holdak) * moon, natural satellite * unit of surface area, originally meant the same as acre, has different kinds ranging from 3500 m^2 to 8400 m^2 DECLENSION DERIVED TERMS

hold (plural holdak)

  1. moon, natural satellite
  2. unit of surface area, originally meant the same as acre, has different kinds ranging from 3500 m^2 to 8400 m^2

Declension

Derived terms

Dont le dans la catégorieICELANDIC - ETYMOLOGY
Informations sur le sujet

Icelandic - Etymology

From Old Norse _hold_, from Proto-Germanic _*huldą_.

From Old Norse hold, from Proto-Germanic *huldą.

Dont le dans la catégorieICELANDIC - PRONUNCIATION
Informations sur le sujet

Icelandic - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): [hɔlt] * Rhymes: -ɔlt

  • IPA(key): [hɔlt]
  • Rhymes: -ɔlt

Dont le dans la catégorieICELANDIC - NOUN
Informations sur le sujet

Icelandic - Noun

HOLD n (_genitive singular_ HOLDS, _no plural_) * flesh * Isaiah 40 (Icelandic, English) _Heyr, einhver segir: "Kalla þú!" Og ég svara: "Hvað skal ég kalla?" "Allt HOLD er gras og allur yndisleikur þess sem blóm vallarins. Grasið visnar, blómin fölna, þegar Drottinn andar á þau. Sannlega, mennirnir eru gras. Grasið visnar, blómin fölna, en orð Guðs vors stendur stöðugt eilíflega."_ A voice says, "Cry out." And I said, "What shall I cry?" "All FLESH are like grass, and all their glory is like the flowers of the field. The grass withers and the flowers fall, because the breath of the LORD blows on them. Surely the people are grass. The grass withers and the flowers fall, but the word of our God stands forever." DECLENSION

hold n (genitive singular holds, no plural)

  1. flesh

Declension

Dont le dans la catégorieMIDDLE ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
Informations sur le sujet

Middle English - Etymology

From Old English _hold_.

From Old English hold.

Dont le dans la catégorieMIDDLE ENGLISH - ADJECTIVE
Informations sur le sujet

Middle English - Adjective

HOLD * friendly, faithful

hold

  1. friendly, faithful

Dont le dans la catégorieMIDDLE ENGLISH - NOUN
Informations sur le sujet

Middle English - Noun

HOLD * carcase, flesh

hold

  1. carcase, flesh

Dont le dans la catégorieMIDDLE ENGLISH - RELATED TERMS
Informations sur le sujet

Middle English - Related Terms

* holdeste, unhold, holdelike, holdoþ

Dont le dans la catégorieNORWEGIAN BOKMÅL - VERB
Informations sur le sujet

Norwegian Bokmål - Verb

HOLD * imperative of _holde_

hold

  1. imperative of holde

Dont le dans la catégorieOLD ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
Informations sur le sujet

Old English - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /hold/

  • IPA(key): /hold/

Dont le dans la catégorieOLD ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
Informations sur le sujet

Old English - Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic _*huldą_, from Proto-Indo-European _*kol-_, _*kwol-_. Cognates include Old Norse _hold_ (“flesh”) (Icelandic _hold_, Swedish _hull_), and (from Indo-European) Old Irish _colainn_, Welsh _celain_. NOUN HOLD n * Dead body or carcase, lich _Swa swa grædige ræmmas ðar ðar hi hold geseoþ._ Like greedy ravens when they see a corpse.

From Proto-Germanic *huldą, from Proto-Indo-European *kol-, *kwol-. Cognates include Old Norse hold (flesh) (Icelandic hold, Swedish hull), and (from Indo-European) Old Irish colainn, Welsh celain.

Noun

hold n

  1. Dead body or carcase, lich
    Swa swa grædige ræmmas ðar ðar hi hold geseoþ. Like greedy ravens when they see a corpse.

Dont le dans la catégorieOLD ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Informations sur le sujet

Old English - Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic _*hulþaz_, a variant on a root meaning ‘lean, incline’ (compare Old English _heald_, _hieldan_). Cognates include Old Frisian _hold_, Old Saxon _hold_, Old High German _hold_ (German _hold_), Old Norse _hollr_ (Danish _huld_, Swedish _huld_), Gothic

From Proto-Germanic *hulþaz, a variant on a root meaning ‘lean, incline’ (compare Old English heald, hieldan). Cognates include Old Frisian hold, Old Saxon hold, Old High German hold (German hold), Old Norse hollr (Danish huld, Swedish huld), Gothic

Dont le dans la catégorieOLD HIGH GERMAN - ADJECTIVE
Informations sur le sujet

Old High German - Adjective

HOLD * friendly DERIVED TERMS * huldī DESCENDANTS * German: hold

hold

  1. friendly

Derived terms

Descendants


comments powered by Disqus

Vidéos similaires

Facebook




[X]

Rencontrer des gens


Pratiquez votre anglais, rencontrer des gens à travers le monde

Trouver