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Il a 4 courrier ( p a g e )         2 voyelles ( a e )         2 consonnes ( p g )         Parole au contraire egap

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /peɪdʒ/ * Rhymes: -eɪdʒ * (Tasmanian) IPA(key): /paːʒ/

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

Via Middle French from Latin _pāgina_. NOUN PAGE (_plural_ PAGES) * One of the many pieces of paper bound together within a book or similar document. * Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) Such was the book from whose PAGES she sang. * One side of a paper leaf on which one has written or printed. * A figurative record or writing; a collective memory. _the PAGE of history_ * (typography) The type set up for printing a page. * (Internet) A web page. * (computing) A block of contiguous memory of a fixed length. SYNONYMS * (side of a leaf): side * (record, writing): account, record DERIVED TERMS TRANSLATIONS VERB PAGE (_third-person singular simple present_ PAGES, _present participle_ PAGING, _simple past and past participle_ PAGED) * (transitive) To mark or number the pages of, as a book or manuscript. * (intransitive, often with “through”) To turn several pages of a publication. _The patient PAGED through magazines while he waited for the doctor._ * (transitive) To furnish with folios. TRANSLATIONS

Via Middle French from Latin pāgina.

Noun

page (plural pages)

  1. One of the many pieces of paper bound together within a book or similar document.
  2. One side of a paper leaf on which one has written or printed.
  3. A figurative record or writing; a collective memory.
    the page of history
  4. (typography) The type set up for printing a page.
  5. (Internet) A web page.
  6. (computing) A block of contiguous memory of a fixed length.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

page (third-person singular simple present pages, present participle paging, simple past and past participle paged)

  1. (transitive) To mark or number the pages of, as a book or manuscript.
  2. (intransitive, often with “through”) To turn several pages of a publication.
    The patient paged through magazines while he waited for the doctor.
  3. (transitive) To furnish with folios.
Translations

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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English - Etymology 2

From Old French _page_, possibly via Italian _paggio_, from Late Latin _pagius_ (“servant”), probably from Ancient Greek _παιδίον_ (paidíon, “boy, lad”), from _παῖς_ (paîs, “child”); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin _pagus_ (“countryside”), in sense of "boy from the rural regions". Used in English from the 13th century onwards. NOUN PAGE (_plural_ PAGES) * (obsolete) A serving boy – a youth attending a person of high degree, especially at courts, as a position of honor and education. * (UK) A youth employed for doing errands, waiting on the door, and similar service in households. * (US) A boy employed to wait upon the members of a legislative body. * (in libraries) The common name given to an employee whose main purpose is to replace materials that have either been checked out or otherwise moved, back to their shelves. * A boy child. * 1380+, Geoffrey Chaucer, _The Canterbury Tales_ A doghter hadde they bitwixe hem two / Of twenty yeer, with-outen any mo, / Savinge a child that was of half-yeer age; / In cradel it lay and was a propre PAGE. * A contrivance, as a band, pin, snap, or the like, to hold the skirt of a woman’s dress from the ground. * A track along which pallets carrying newly molded bricks are conveyed to the hack. * Any one of several species of colorful South American moths of the genus _Urania_. SYNONYMS * (serving boy): page boy * (boy child): boy TRANSLATIONS VERB PAGE (_third-person singular simple present_ PAGES, _present participle_ PAGING, _simple past and past participle_ PAGED) * (transitive) To attend (someone) as a page. (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?) * (transitive, US, obsolete in UK) To call or summon (someone). * (transitive) To contact (someone) by means of a pager. _I’ll be out all day, so PAGE me if you need me._ * (transitive) To call (somebody) using a public address system so as to find them. _An SUV parked me in. Could you please PAGE its owner?_ TRANSLATIONS

From Old French page, possibly via Italian paggio, from Late Latin pagius (servant), probably from Ancient Greek παιδίον (paidíon, boy, lad), from παῖς (paîs, child); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin pagus (countryside), in sense of "boy from the rural regions". Used in English from the 13th century onwards.

Noun

page (plural pages)

  1. (obsolete) A serving boya youth attending a person of high degree, especially at courts, as a position of honor and education.
  2. (UK) A youth employed for doing errands, waiting on the door, and similar service in households.
  3. (US) A boy employed to wait upon the members of a legislative body.
  4. (in libraries) The common name given to an employee whose main purpose is to replace materials that have either been checked out or otherwise moved, back to their shelves.
  5. A boy child.
  6. A contrivance, as a band, pin, snap, or the like, to hold the skirt of a woman’s dress from the ground.
  7. A track along which pallets carrying newly molded bricks are conveyed to the hack.
  8. Any one of several species of colorful South American moths of the genus Urania.
Synonyms
Translations

Verb

page (third-person singular simple present pages, present participle paging, simple past and past participle paged)

  1. (transitive) To attend (someone) as a page.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  2. (transitive, US, obsolete in UK) To call or summon (someone).
  3. (transitive) To contact (someone) by means of a pager.
    I’ll be out all day, so page me if you need me.
  4. (transitive) To call (somebody) using a public address system so as to find them.
    An SUV parked me in. Could you please page its owner?
Translations

Dont le dans la catégorieENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
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English - Anagrams

* gape

Dont le dans la catégorieDUTCH - PRONUNCIATION
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Dutch - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /ˈpaː.ʒə/ * Hyphenation: pa‧ge

  • IPA(key): /ˈpaː.ʒə/
  • Hyphenation: pa‧ge

Dont le dans la catégorieDUTCH - ETYMOLOGY
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Dutch - Etymology

From Old French _page_, possibly via Italian _paggio_, from Late Latin _pagius_ (“servant”), probably from Ancient Greek _παιδίον_ (paidíon, “boy, lad”), from _παῖς_ (paîs, “child”); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin _pagus_ (“countryside”), in sense of "boy from the rural regions".

From Old French page, possibly via Italian paggio, from Late Latin pagius (servant), probably from Ancient Greek παιδίον (paidíon, boy, lad), from παῖς (paîs, child); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin pagus (countryside), in sense of "boy from the rural regions".

Dont le dans la catégorieDUTCH - NOUN
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Dutch - Noun

PAGE

page

Dont le dans la catégorieDUTCH - REFERENCES
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Dutch - References

* “page” in _Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling_, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]

Dont le dans la catégorieDUTCH - ANAGRAMS
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Dutch - Anagrams

* gape

Dont le dans la catégorieFRENCH - PRONUNCIATION
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French - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /paʒ/ * Rhymes: -ɑʒ

  • IPA(key): /paʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɑʒ

Dont le dans la catégorieFRENCH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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French - Etymology 1

From Old French _page_, borrowed from Latin _pāgina_ (“page, strip of papyrus fastened to others”), related to _pagella_ (“small page”), from _pangere_ (“to fasten”), from Proto-Indo-European _*pag-_ (“to fix”). NOUN PAGE

From Old French page, borrowed from Latin pāgina (page, strip of papyrus fastened to others), related to pagella (small page), from pangere (to fasten), from Proto-Indo-European *pag- (to fix).

Noun

page

Dont le dans la catégorieFRENCH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Informations sur le sujet

French - Etymology 2

From Old French _page_, possibly via Italian _paggio_, from Late Latin _pagius_ (“servant”), probably from Ancient Greek _παιδίον_ (paidíon, “boy, lad”), from _παῖς_ (paîs, “child”); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin _pagus_ (“countryside”), in sense of "boy from the rural regions". NOUN PAGE

From Old French page, possibly via Italian paggio, from Late Latin pagius (servant), probably from Ancient Greek παιδίον (paidíon, boy, lad), from παῖς (paîs, child); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin pagus (countryside), in sense of "boy from the rural regions".

Noun

page

Dont le dans la catégorieFRENCH - EXTERNAL LINKS
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French - External Links

* “page” in _le Trésor de la langue française informatisé_ (_The Digitized Treasury of the French Language_).

Dont le dans la catégorieJÈRRIAIS - ETYMOLOGY
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Jèrriais - Etymology

Borrowed from Latin _pāgina_ (“page, strip of papyrus fastened to others”).

Borrowed from Latin pāgina (page, strip of papyrus fastened to others).

Dont le dans la catégorieJÈRRIAIS - NOUN
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Jèrriais - Noun

PAGE f (_plural_ PAGES) * page

page f (plural pages)

  1. page

Dont le dans la catégorieLATIN - NOUN
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Latin - Noun

PĀGE * vocative singular of _pāgus_

pāge

  1. vocative singular of pāgus

Dont le dans la catégorieOLD FRENCH - ALTERNATIVE FORMS
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Old French - Alternative Forms

* paige * parge

Dont le dans la catégorieOLD FRENCH - PRONUNCIATION
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Old French - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /ˈpa.dʒə/

  • IPA(key): /ˈpa.dʒə/

Dont le dans la catégorieOLD FRENCH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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Old French - Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin _pāgina_. NOUN PAGE

Borrowed from Latin pāgina.

Noun

page

Dont le dans la catégorieOLD FRENCH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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Old French - Etymology 2

Disputed, see page in English above. NOUN PAGE

Disputed, see page in English above.

Noun

page

Dont le dans la catégorieSPANISH - NOUN
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Spanish - Noun

PAGE

page

Dont le dans la catégorieSWEDISH - ETYMOLOGY
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Swedish - Etymology

From Old French _page_, possibly via Italian _paggio_, from Late Latin _pagius_ (“servant”), probably from Ancient Greek _παιδίον_ (paidíon, “boy, lad”), from _παῖς_ (paîs, “child”); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin _pagus_ (“countryside”), in sense of "boy from the rural regions".

From Old French page, possibly via Italian paggio, from Late Latin pagius (servant), probably from Ancient Greek παιδίον (paidíon, boy, lad), from παῖς (paîs, child); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin pagus (countryside), in sense of "boy from the rural regions".

Dont le dans la catégorieSWEDISH - PRONUNCIATION
Informations sur le sujet

Swedish - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /pɑːɧ/

  • IPA(key): /pɑːɧ/

Dont le dans la catégorieSWEDISH - NOUN
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Swedish - Noun

PAGE

page


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