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bill   
      

Tem 4 letras ( b i l l )         1 vogais ( i )         3 consoantes ( b l l )         Palavra ao contrário llib

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* (UK) IPA(key): /bɪl/, /bɪɫ/ * (US) IPA(key): /bɪɫ/ * Rhymes: -ɪl

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɪl/, /bɪɫ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bɪɫ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

From Old English _bil_, from West Germanic. Cognate with German _Bille_ (“axe”) and Dutch _bijl_ (“axe”). NOUN BILL (_plural_ BILLS) * Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff. * (Can we date this quote?), Thomas Babington Macaulay France had no infantry that dared to face the English bows and BILLS. * 1786, Francis Grose, _A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons_. In the British Museum there is an entry of a warrant, granted to Nicholas Spicer, authorising him to impress smiths for making two thousand Welch BILLS or glaives. * A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle, used in pruning, etc.; a billhook. * Somebody armed with a bill; a billman. (Can we find and add a quotation of Strype to this entry?) * A pickaxe, or mattock. * (nautical) The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke. SYNONYMS * (weapon): polearm * (cutting instrument): billhook, hand bill, hedge bill * (somebody armed with a bill): billman DERIVED TERMS * brown-bill TRANSLATIONS VERB BILL (_third-person singular simple present_ BILLS, _present participle_ BILLING, _simple past and past participle_ BILLED) * (transitive) To dig, chop, etc., with a bill. TRANSLATIONS

From Old English bil, from West Germanic. Cognate with German Bille (axe) and Dutch bijl (axe).

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff.
  2. A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle, used in pruning, etc.; a billhook.
  3. Somebody armed with a bill; a billman.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Strype to this entry?)
  4. A pickaxe, or mattock.
  5. (nautical) The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke.
Synonyms
Derived terms
  • brown-bill
Translations

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (transitive) To dig, chop, etc., with a bill.
Translations

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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English - Etymology 2

Old English _bile_, of unknown origin. NOUN BILL (_plural_ BILLS) * The beak of a bird, especially when small or flattish; sometimes also used with reference to a turtle, platypus, or other animal. * 1595, The woosel cock so black of hue, With orange-tawny BILL, The throstle with his note so true, The wren with little quill... — William Shakespeare, _A Midsummer Night's Dream_, Act III, Scene I, line 125. * A beak-like projection, especially a promontory. SYNONYMS * (beak of a bird) beak, neb, nib, pecker DERIVED TERMS * duckbill TRANSLATIONS VERB BILL (_third-person singular simple present_ BILLS, _present participle_ BILLING, _simple past and past participle_ BILLED) * (obsolete) To peck. * To stroke bill against bill, with reference to doves; to caress in fondness. * 1599, As the ox hath his bow, sir, the horse his curb and the falcon her bells, so man hath his desires; and as pigeons bill, so wedlock would be nibbling. TRANSLATIONS

Old English bile, of unknown origin.

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. The beak of a bird, especially when small or flattish; sometimes also used with reference to a turtle, platypus, or other animal.
  2. A beak-like projection, especially a promontory.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (obsolete) To peck.
  2. To stroke bill against bill, with reference to doves; to caress in fondness.
Translations

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 3
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology 3

Anglo-Norman _bille_, from Old French _bulle_, from Medieval Latin _bulla_ (“seal", "sealed document”). Compare bull. NOUN BILL (_plural_ BILLS) * A written list or inventory. (_Now obsolete except in specific senses or set phrases; bill of lading, bill of goods, etc._) * A document, originally sealed; a formal statement or official memorandum. (_Now obsolete except with certain qualifying words; bill of health, bill of sale etc._) * A draft of a law, presented to a legislature for enactment; a proposed or projected law. * 1600, Why, I'll exhibit a BILL in the parliament for the putting down of men. — William Shakespeare, _The Merry Wives of Windsor_, Act II, Scene I, line 28. * (obsolete, law) A declaration made in writing, stating some wrong the complainant has suffered from the defendant, or a fault committed by some person against a law. * (US) A piece of paper money; a banknote. * 1830, Anon, _The Galaxy of Wit: Or, Laughing Philosopher, Being a Collection of Choice Anecdotes, Many of Which Originated in or about "The Literary Emporium"_ — He gave the change for a three dollar BILL. Upon examination, the BILL proved to be counterfeit. * A written note of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; an invoice. * 1607, My lord, here is my BILL. — William Shakespeare, _Timon of Athens_, Act III, Scene IV, line 85. * A paper, written or printed, and posted up or given away, to advertise something, as a lecture, a play, or the sale of goods; a placard; a poster; a handbill. * 1595, In the meantime I will draw a BILL of properties, such as our play wants. — William Shakespeare, _A Midsummer Night's Dream_, Act I, Scene II, line 104. * She put up the BILL in her parlor window. — Dickens. * A writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day or on demand, with or without interest, as may be stated in the document. A bill of exchange. In the United States, it is usually called a note, a note of hand, or a promissory note. * 1600, Ay, and Rato-lorum too; and a gentleman born, Master Parson; who writes himself Armigero, in any bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation, Armigero. — William Shakespeare, _The Merry Wives of Windsor_, Act I, Scene I, line 8. SYNONYMS * (account of goods): account, invoice * (written or printed advertisement posted or otherwise distributed): broadsheet, broadside, card,circular, flier, flyer, handbill, poster, posting, placard, notice, throwaway * (draft of a law): measure * (writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day): bank bill, banker's bill, bank note, banknote, Federal Reserve note, government note, greenback, note DERIVED TERMS TRANSLATIONS SEE ALSO * check VERB BILL (_third-person singular simple present_ BILLS, _present participle_ BILLING, _simple past and past participle_ BILLED) * (transitive) To advertise by a bill or public notice. * (transitive) To charge; to send a bill to. SYNONYMS * (to advertise by a bill): placard * (to charge): charge TRANSLATIONS

Anglo-Norman bille, from Old French bulle, from Medieval Latin bulla (seal", "sealed document). Compare bull.

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. A written list or inventory. (Now obsolete except in specific senses or set phrases; bill of lading, bill of goods, etc.)
  2. A document, originally sealed; a formal statement or official memorandum. (Now obsolete except with certain qualifying words; bill of health, bill of sale etc.)
  3. A draft of a law, presented to a legislature for enactment; a proposed or projected law.
  4. (obsolete, law) A declaration made in writing, stating some wrong the complainant has suffered from the defendant, or a fault committed by some person against a law.
  5. (US) A piece of paper money; a banknote.
  6. A written note of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; an invoice.
  7. A paper, written or printed, and posted up or given away, to advertise something, as a lecture, a play, or the sale of goods; a placard; a poster; a handbill.
  8. A writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day or on demand, with or without interest, as may be stated in the document. A bill of exchange. In the United States, it is usually called a note, a note of hand, or a promissory note.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
See also

Verb

bill (third-person singular simple present bills, present participle billing, simple past and past participle billed)

  1. (transitive) To advertise by a bill or public notice.
  2. (transitive) To charge; to send a bill to.
Synonyms
Translations

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 4
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology 4

NOUN BILL (_plural_ BILLS) * The bell, or boom, of the bittern. * Wordsworth The bittern's hollow BILL was heard.

Noun

bill (plural bills)

  1. The bell, or boom, of the bittern.


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