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bishop   
      

Tem 6 letras ( b i s h o p )         2 vogais ( i o )         4 consoantes ( b s h p )         Palavra ao contrário pohsib

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /ˈbɪʃəp/

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɪʃəp/

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _bishop_, _bisshop_, _bischop_, _biscop_, from Old English _biscop_ (“bishop”), from British Latin *_biscopo_ or Vulgar Latin _biscopus_, from classical Latin _episcopus_ (“overseer, supervisor”), from Ancient Greek _ἐπίσκοπος_ (epískopos, “overseer”), from _ἐπί_ (epí, “over”) + _σκοπός_ (skopós, “watcher”), used in Greek and Latin both generally and as a title of civil officers. Cognate with all European terms for the position in various Christian churches (_see_ BELOW); compare bisp. ALTERNATIVE FORMS * (obsolete) byshop NOUN BISHOP (_plural_ BISHOPS) * (Christianity) An overseer of congregations: either any such overseer, generally speaking, or (in Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, etc.) an official in the church hierarchy (actively or nominally) governing a diocese, supervising the church's priests, deacons, and property in its territory. * _c._ 897, Alfred the Great translating St. Gregory's _Pastoral Care_ (Hatton MS.), 1 Ælfred kyning hateð gretan Wærferð BISCEP. * 1382, Wycliffe's Bible, Acts xx. 28 Al the folk in which the Hooly Gost sette ȝou BISCHOPIS. [_Compare_ Tindale _oversears_, Cranmer _ouersears_, Geneva _Ouersears_, Douay _BISHOPS_, KJV _ouerseers_, ERV _BISHOPS_ with the marginal gloss _or overseers_.] * _c._ 1383'_, John Wyclif,_ Selected Works_, III. 310_ Crist veriest BISCHOP of alle. * 1641, ‘Smectymnuus’, _Vindic. Answer Hvmble Remonstr._, 16. 208 King James of blessed memory said, _no BISHOP, no King:_ it was not he, but others that added, _No Ceremony, no BISHOP._ * 1715, William Hendley, _A Defence of the Church of England_, 16 _St. Ignatius_... In his 'Epiſtle to the _Magneſians_,' _he exhorts them to do all things in the love of God_, telling them, _the BISHOP preſides in the place of God_... * 1845, J. Lingard, _Hist. & Antiq. Anglo-Saxon Church_ 3rd ed., I. iv. 146 These ministers were at first confined to the three orders of BISHOPS, priests, and deacons. * 1868, Joseph Barber Lightfoot, _St. Paul's epistle to the Philippians_, 93 It is a fact now generally recognized by theologians of all shades of opinion, that in the language of the New Testament the same officer in the Church is called indifferently ‘BISHOP’ ἐπίσκοπος and ‘elder’ or ‘presbyter’ πρεσβύτερος. * (religion, obsolete) A similar official or chief priest in another religion. * _c._ 893,, translating Orosius's _History_, v. iv. 1 Lucinius Crassus... wæs eac Romana ieldesta BISCEP. * 1586, Thomas Bowes translating Pierre de la Primaudaye's _The French Academie_, I. 633 The Caliphaes of the Sarasins were kings and chiefe BISHOPS in their religion. * 1615, William Bedwell, _Arabian Trudgman_ in translating _Mohammedis Imposturæ_, sig. N4 The BYSHOP of Egypt is called the Souldan. * (obsolete) Any watchman, inspector, or overlooker. * 1592, Lancelot Andrewes, _Sermons_ (1843), v. 516 No pinnacle so high but the devil is a BISHOP over it, to visit and overlook it. * (obsolete) The holder of the Greek or Roman position of _episcopus_, supervisor over the public dole of grain, etc. * 1808, _The Monthly Magazine and British Register_, 26 109 They gave away corn, not cash; and Cicero was made BISHOP, or overseer, of this public victualling. * The chief of the Festival of Fools or St. Nicholas Day. * (chess) The chess piece denoted ♗ or ♝ which moves along diagonal lines and developed from the shatranj alfil ("elephant") and was originally known as the aufil or archer in English. * 1562, Rowbotham in _Archaeologia_, XXIV. 203 The BISHOPPES some name Alphins, some fooles, and some name them Princes; other some call them Archers. * 1656, Francis Beale translating Gioachino Greco as _The royall game of chesse-play, being the study of Biochimo_, 2 A BISHOP or Archer, who is commonly figured with his head cloven. * Any of various African birds of the genus _Euplectes_; a kind of weaverbird closely related to the widowbirds. * (dialectal) A ladybug or ladybird, beetles of the genus _Coccinellidae_. * 1875, William

From Middle English bishop, bisshop, bischop, biscop, from Old English biscop (bishop), from British Latin *biscopo or Vulgar Latin biscopus, from classical Latin episcopus (overseer, supervisor), from Ancient Greek ἐπίσκοπος (epískopos, overseer), from ἐπί (epí, over) + σκοπός (skopós, watcher), used in Greek and Latin both generally and as a title of civil officers. Cognate with all European terms for the position in various Christian churches (see below); compare bisp.

Alternative forms

Noun

bishop (plural bishops)

  1. (Christianity) An overseer of congregations: either any such overseer, generally speaking, or (in Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, etc.) an official in the church hierarchy (actively or nominally) governing a diocese, supervising the church's priests, deacons, and property in its territory.
    1. (religion, obsolete) A similar official or chief priest in another religion.
    2. (obsolete) Any watchman, inspector, or overlooker.
    3. (obsolete) The holder of the Greek or Roman position of episcopus, supervisor over the public dole of grain, etc.
    4. The chief of the Festival of Fools or St. Nicholas Day.
  2. (chess) The chess piece denotedorwhich moves along diagonal lines and developed from the shatranj alfil ("elephant") and was originally known as the aufil or archer in English.
  3. Any of various African birds of the genus Euplectes; a kind of weaverbird closely related to the widowbirds.
  4. (dialectal) A ladybug or ladybird, beetles of the genus Coccinellidae.

English - Etymology 2

Eponymous, from the surname Bishop. VERB BISHOP (_third-person singular simple present_ BISHOPS, _present participle_ BISHOPING _or_ BISHOPPING, _simple past and past participle_ BISHOPED _or_ BISHOPPED) * (UK, colloquial, obsolete) To murder by drowning. * 1840, R.H. Barham, _Some Account of a New Play_ in _Ingoldsby Legends_ 1st series, 308 I Burked the papa, now I'll BISHOP the son. * 1870, Walter Thornbury, _Old Stories Re-told_ There were no more Burking murders until 1831, when two men, named Bishop and Williams, drowned a poor [14-year-old] Italian boy in Bethnal Green, and sold his body to the surgeons. * 2002, Helen Smith, _Grave-Robbers, Cut-throats, and Poisoners of London_, 66 John Bishop and another grave-robber called Thomas Williams had drowned the boy, a woman and another boy in a well in John Bishop's garden in Bethnal Green... Bishop and Williams were hanged outside Newgate Prison in December 1831 in front of an angry crowd of 30,000.

Eponymous, from the surname Bishop.

Verb

bishop (third-person singular simple present bishops, present participle bishoping or bishopping, simple past and past participle bishoped or bishopped)

  1. (UK, colloquial, obsolete) To murder by drowning.

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - REFERENCES
Informações sobre o assunto

English - References

* _Oxford English Dictionary_, 1st ed. "bishop, _n._", "bishop, _v.1_", and "bishop, _v.2_". Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1887. * _Webster's New International Dictionary_. "Bishop". 1913.


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