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Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
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English - Etymology

From Middle English _comen_, _cumen_, from Old English _coman_, _cuman_ (“to come, go, happen”), from Proto-Germanic _*kwemaną_ (“to come”), from Proto-Indo-European _*gʷem-_, _*gʷém-_, _*gʷem-ye-_ (“to come, go, be born”).

From Middle English comen, cumen, from Old English coman, cuman (to come, go, happen), from Proto-Germanic *kwemaną (to come), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷem-, *gʷém-, *gʷem-ye- (to come, go, be born).

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* (UK) IPA(key): /kʌm/, [kʰɐm], enPR: kŭm * (US) IPA(key): /kʌm/, [kʰʌm], enPR: kŭm * Rhymes: -ʌm * Homophone: cum

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kʌm/, [kʰɐm], enPR: kŭm
  • (US) IPA(key): /kʌm/, [kʰʌm], enPR: kŭm
  • Rhymes: -ʌm
  • Homophone: cum

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - VERB
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English - Verb

COME (_third-person singular simple present_ COMES, _present participle_ COMING, _simple past_ CAME, _past participle_ COME _or_ COMEN) * (intransitive) To move from further away to nearer to. _She’ll be COMING ’round the mountain when she COMES […]_ * William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Look, who COMES yonder? * Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892) I did not COME to curse thee. * To move towards the speaker. _I called the dog, but she wouldn't COME._ _Stop dawdling and COME here!_ * To move towards the listener. _Hold on, I'll COME in a second._ _You should ask the doctor to COME to your house._ * To move towards the object that is the focus of the sentence. _No-one can find Bertie Wooster when his aunts COME to visit._ _Hundreds of thousands of people COME to Disneyland every year._ * (in subordinate clauses and gerunds) To move towards the agent or subject of the main clause. _King Cnut couldn't stop the tide COMING._ _He threw the boomerang, which CAME right back to him._ * To move towards an unstated agent. _The butler should COME when called._ * (intransitive) To arrive. _The guests CAME at eight o'clock._ * (intransitive) To appear, to manifest itself. _The pain in his leg COMES and goes._ * Samuel Butler (1613-1680), _Hudibras_ when butter does refuse to COME [i.e. to form] * (intransitive) To take a position to something else in a sequence. _Which letter COMES before Y?   Winter COMES after autumn._ * (intransitive, slang) To achieve orgasm; to cum. _He CAME after a few minutes._ * (copulative, figuratively, with _close_) To approach a state of being or accomplishment. _They CAME very close to leaving on time.   His test scores CAME close to perfect._ _One of the screws CAME loose, and the skateboard fell apart._ * (figuratively, with _to_) To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something. _He CAME to SF literature a confirmed technophile, and nothing made him happier than to read a manuscript thick with imaginary gizmos and whatzits._ * (copulative, archaic) To become, to turn out to be. _He was a dream COME true._ * William Shakespeare (1564-1616) How COME you thus estranged? * (intransitive) To be supplied, or made available; to exist. _He's as tough as they COME.   Our milkshakes COME in vanilla, strawberry and chocolate flavours._ * (slang) To carry through; to succeed in. _You can't COME any tricks here._ * (intransitive) Happen. _This kind of accident COMES when you are careless._ * (intransitive, with _from_ or sometimes _of_) To have a social background. * To be or have been a resident or native. _Where did you COME from?_ * To have been brought up by or employed by. _She COMES from a good family._ _He COMES from a disreputable legal firm._ * (intransitive, of _grain_) To germinate. USAGE NOTES In its general sense, _come_ specifically marks motion towards the deictic centre (whether explicitly stated or not). Its counterpart, usually referring to motion away from or not involving the deictic centre, is _go_. For example, the sentence "Come to the tree" implies contextually that the speaker is already at the tree - "Go to the tree" often implies that the speaker is elsewhere. Either the speaker or the listener can be the deictic centre - the sentences "I will go to you" and "I will come to you" are both valid, depending on the exact nuances of the context. When there is no clear speaker or listener, the deictic centre is usually the focus of the sentence or the topic of the piece

come (third-person singular simple present comes, present participle coming, simple past came, past participle come or comen)

  1. (intransitive) To move from further away to nearer to.
    She’ll be coming ’round the mountain when she comes []
    1. To move towards the speaker.
      I called the dog, but she wouldn't come.
      Stop dawdling and come here!
    2. To move towards the listener.
      Hold on, I'll come in a second.
      You should ask the doctor to come to your house.
    3. To move towards the object that is the focus of the sentence.
      No-one can find Bertie Wooster when his aunts come to visit.
      Hundreds of thousands of people come to Disneyland every year.
    4. (in subordinate clauses and gerunds) To move towards the agent or subject of the main clause.
      King Cnut couldn't stop the tide coming.
      He threw the boomerang, which came right back to him.
    5. To move towards an unstated agent.
      The butler should come when called.
  2. (intransitive) To arrive.
    The guests came at eight o'clock.
  3. (intransitive) To appear, to manifest itself.
    The pain in his leg comes and goes.
  4. (intransitive) To take a position to something else in a sequence.
    Which letter comes before Y?   Winter comes after autumn.
  5. (intransitive, slang) To achieve orgasm; to cum.
    He came after a few minutes.
  6. (copulative, figuratively, with close) To approach a state of being or accomplishment.
    They came very close to leaving on time.   His test scores came close to perfect.
    One of the screws came loose, and the skateboard fell apart.
  7. (figuratively, with to) To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something.
    He came to SF literature a confirmed technophile, and nothing made him happier than to read a manuscript thick with imaginary gizmos and whatzits.
  8. (copulative, archaic) To become, to turn out to be.
    He was a dream come true.
  9. (intransitive) To be supplied, or made available; to exist.
    He's as tough as they come.   Our milkshakes come in vanilla, strawberry and chocolate flavours.
  10. (slang) To carry through; to succeed in.
    You can't come any tricks here.
  11. (intransitive) Happen.
    This kind of accident comes when you are careless.
  12. (intransitive, with from or sometimes of) To have a social background.
    1. To be or have been a resident or native.
      Where did you come from?
    2. To have been brought up by or employed by.
      She comes from a good family.
      He comes from a disreputable legal firm.
  13. (intransitive, of grain) To germinate.

Usage notes

In its general sense, come specifically marks motion towards the deictic centre (whether explicitly stated or not). Its counterpart, usually referring to motion away from or not involving the deictic centre, is go. For example, the sentence "Come to the tree" implies contextually that the speaker is already at the tree - "Go to the tree" often implies that the speaker is elsewhere. Either the speaker or the listener can be the deictic centre - the sentences "I will go to you" and "I will come to you" are both valid, depending on the exact nuances of the context. When there is no clear speaker or listener, the deictic centre is usually the focus of the sentence or the topic of the piece

Informações sobre o assunto

English - Noun

COME (_uncountable_) * (obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach. * 1869, RD Blackmoore, _Lorna Doone_, II: “If we count three before the COME of thee, thwacked thou art, and must go to the women.” * (slang) Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge. SEE ALSO * cum

come (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach.
  2. (slang) Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge.

See also

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PREPOSITION
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Preposition

COME * Used to indicate an event, period, or change in state occurring after a present time. _Leave it to settle for about three months and, COME Christmas time, you'll have a delicious concoctions to offer your guests._ _COME retirement, their Social Security may turn out to be a lot less than they counted on._ * COME the final whistle, Mikel Arteta lay flabbergasted on the turf. USAGE NOTES * _Came_ is often used when both the indicated event, period or change in state occurred in the past.

come

  1. Used to indicate an event, period, or change in state occurring after a present time.
    Leave it to settle for about three months and, come Christmas time, you'll have a delicious concoctions to offer your guests.
    Come retirement, their Social Security may turn out to be a lot less than they counted on.

Usage notes

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - INTERJECTION
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Interjection

COME * An exclamation to express annoyance. _COME COME! Stop crying.  COME now! You must eat it._ * An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request. _COME COME! You can do it.  COME now! It won't bite you._ * 1908, W. B. M. Ferguson, _Zollenstein_, chapterI: “I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “COME, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.

come

  1. An exclamation to express annoyance.
    Come come! Stop crying.  Come now! You must eat it.
  2. An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request.
    Come come! You can do it.  Come now! It won't bite you.

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - REFERENCES
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English - References

* ^ Chicago Dialect

  1. ^ Chicago Dialect

Que a categoria em ASTURIAN - VERB
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Asturian - Verb

COME * third-person singular present indicative of _comer_

come

  1. third-person singular present indicative of comer

Que a categoria em GALICIAN - VERB
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Galician - Verb

COME * third-person singular present indicative of _comer_ * second-person singular imperative of _comer_

come

  1. third-person singular present indicative of comer
  2. second-person singular imperative of comer

Que a categoria em ITALIAN - PRONUNCIATION
Informações sobre o assunto

Italian - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): [ˈkome]

  • IPA(key): [ˈkome]

Que a categoria em ITALIAN - ETYMOLOGY
Informações sobre o assunto

Italian - Etymology

From Latin _quomodo_ + _et_. Cognate to French _comme_. See also Spanish _como_/_cómo_ and Catalan _com_.

From Latin quomodo + et. Cognate to French comme. See also Spanish como/cómo and Catalan com.

Que a categoria em ITALIAN - ADVERB
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Italian - Adverb

COME * how _COME stai?_ (informal) HOW are you? _COME sta?_ (formal) HOW are you? * as, like _Blu COME il mare,_ As blue AS the sea. * such as DERIVED TERMS * come mai * come no * come se

come

  1. how
    Come stai? (informal)
    How are you?
    Come sta? (formal)
    How are you?
  2. as, like
    Blu come il mare,
    As blue as the sea.
  3. such as

Derived terms

Que a categoria em ITALIAN - CONJUNCTION
Informações sobre o assunto

Italian - Conjunction

COME * as soon as _COME arrivò..._ - As soon as he arrived... DERIVED TERMS * come non detto

come

  1. as soon as
    Come arrivò... - As soon as he arrived...

Derived terms

Que a categoria em ITALIAN - ANAGRAMS
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Italian - Anagrams

* meco

Que a categoria em LATIN - ADJECTIVE
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Latin - Adjective

CŌME * nominative neuter singular of _cōmis_ * accusative neuter singular of _cōmis_ * vocative neuter singular of _cōmis_

cōme

  1. nominative neuter singular of cōmis
  2. accusative neuter singular of cōmis
  3. vocative neuter singular of cōmis

Que a categoria em PORTUGUESE - PRONUNCIATION
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Portuguese - Pronunciation

* Hyphenation: co‧me

  • Hyphenation: co‧me

Que a categoria em PORTUGUESE - VERB
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Portuguese - Verb

COME * Third-person singular (_ele_, _ela_, also used with _tu_ and _você_?) present indicative of comer * Second-person singular (_tu_) affirmative imperative of comer

come

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of comer
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of comer

Que a categoria em SPANISH - PRONUNCIATION
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Spanish - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /ˈkome/

  • IPA(key): /ˈkome/

Que a categoria em SPANISH - VERB
Informações sobre o assunto

Spanish - Verb

COME * third-person singular present indicative of _comer_ * second-person singular present imperative of _comer_

come

  1. third-person singular present indicative of comer
  2. second-person singular present imperative of comer


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