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Tem 4 letras ( d o w n )         1 vogais ( o )         3 consoantes ( d w n )         Palavra ao contrário nwod

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /daʊn/ * Rhymes: -aʊn

  • IPA(key): /daʊn/
  • Rhymes: -aʊn

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

Middle English _doun_, from Old English _dūn_, from British Celtic _dunon_ 'hill; hillfort' (compare Welsh _din_ 'hill', Irish _dún_ 'hill, fort'), from Proto-Indo-European *_dheue_ or _dhwene_. More at _town_; akin to _dune_. NOUN DOWN (_countable and uncountable_, _plural_ DOWNS) * (archaic except in place-names) Hill, rolling grassland Churchill DOWNS, Upson DOWNS (from _Auntie Mame_, by Patrick Dennis). * 1610, _The Tempest_, by Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1 And with each end of thy blue bow dost crown My bosky acres and my unshrubb'd DOWN * Ray Hills afford prospects, as they must needs acknowledge who have been on the DOWNS of Sussex. * Tennyson She went by dale, and she went by DOWN. * (chiefly in the plural) Field, especially for racing. * (UK, chiefly in the plural) A tract of poor, sandy, undulating or hilly land near the sea, covered with fine turf which serves chiefly for the grazing of sheep. * Sandys Seven thousand broad-tailed sheep grazed on his DOWNS. * A road for shipping in the English Channel or Straits of Dover, near Deal, employed as a naval rendezvous in time of war. * Cook (First Voyage) On the 11th [June, 1771] we run up the channel […] at noon we were abreast of Dover, and about three came to an anchor in the DOWNS, and went ashore at Deal. TRANSLATIONS

Middle English doun, from Old English dūn, from British Celtic dunon 'hill; hillfort' (compare Welsh din 'hill', Irish dún 'hill, fort'), from Proto-Indo-European *dheue or dhwene. More at town; akin to dune.

Noun

down (countable and uncountable, plural downs)

  1. (archaic except in place-names) Hill, rolling grassland
    Churchill Downs, Upson Downs (from Auntie Mame, by Patrick Dennis).
  2. (chiefly in the plural) Field, especially for racing.
  3. (UK, chiefly in the plural) A tract of poor, sandy, undulating or hilly land near the sea, covered with fine turf which serves chiefly for the grazing of sheep.
  4. A road for shipping in the English Channel or Straits of Dover, near Deal, employed as a naval rendezvous in time of war.
Translations

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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English - Etymology 2

Old English _dūne_, aphetic form of _adūne_, from _of dūne_ (“off the hill”). ADVERB DOWN _(INCOMPARABLE AND COMPARABLE), (COMPARATIVE_ FARTHER DOWN, _SUPERLATIVE_ FARTHEST DOWN_)_ * (comparable) From a higher position to a lower one; downwards. _The cat jumped DOWN from the table._ * 1906, Stanley J. Weyman, _Chippinge Borough_, chapterI: It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking DOWN Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. He wore shepherd's plaid trousers and the swallow-tail coat of the day, with a figured muslin cravat wound about his wide-spread collar. * (comparable) At a lower place or position. _His place is farther DOWN the road._ * South (as south is at the bottom of typical maps). _I went DOWN to Miami for a conference._ * (Ireland) Away from the city (even if the location is to the North). _He went DOWN to Cavan.  DOWN on the farm;  DOWN country_ * Into a state of non-operation. _The computer has been shut DOWN.  They closed the shop DOWN.  The up escalator is DOWN._ * (rail transport) The direction leading away from the principal terminus, away from milepost zero. * (sentence substitute) Get down. _DOWN, boy! (said to a dog)_ * (UK, academia) Away from Oxford or Cambridge. _He's gone back DOWN to Newcastle for Christmas._ * From a remoter or higher antiquity. * (Can we date this quote?) Daniel Webster Venerable men! you have come DOWN to us from a former generation. * From a greater to a less bulk, or from a thinner to a thicker consistence. _to boil DOWN in cookery, or in making decoctions_ (Can we find and add a quotation of Arbuthnot to this entry?) * From less to greater detail. * (intensifier) Used with verbs to add emphasis to the action of the verb. _They tamped (DOWN) the asphalt to get a better bond._ * Used with verbs to indicate that the action of the verb was carried to some state of completion, rather than being of indefinite duration. _He boiled the mixture./He boiled DOWN the mixture. He sat waiting./He sat DOWN and waited._ USAGE NOTES * DOWN can be used with verbs in ways that change the meaning of the verb in ways not entirely predictable from the meanings of the DOWN and the verb, though related to them. See Category:English phrasal verbs with particle (down). ANTONYMS * (From a higher position to a lower one): up * (At a lower place): up * (Ireland: Away from the city): up * (Into a state of non-operation): up * (Rail transport: direction leading away from the principal terminus): up TRANSLATIONS PREPOSITION DOWN * From the higher end to the lower of. _The ball rolled DOWN the hill._ * From one end to another of. _The bus went DOWN the street._ _They walked DOWN the beach holding hands._ ANTONYMS * (From the higher end to the lower): up DERIVED TERMS * (from the higher end to the lower): sell down the river TRANSLATIONS ADJECTIVE DOWN (_comparative_ MORE DOWN, _superlative_ MOST DOWN) * Depressed, feeling low. _So, things got you DOWN? / Is Rodney Dangerfield giving you no respect? / Well, bunky, cheer up!_ * On a lower level than before. _The stock market is DOWN._ _Prices are DOWN._ * Having a lower score than an opponent. _They are DOWN by 3-0 with just 5 minutes to play._ _He was DOWN by a bishop and a pawn after 15 moves._ _At 5-1 DOWN, she produced a great comeback to win the set on a tiebreak._ * (baseball, colloquial, following the noun modified) Out. Two DOWN and one to go in the

Old English dūne, aphetic form of adūne, from of dūne (off the hill).

Adverb

down (incomparable and comparable), (comparative farther down, superlative farthest down)

  1. (comparable) From a higher position to a lower one; downwards.
    The cat jumped down from the table.
  2. (comparable) At a lower place or position.
    His place is farther down the road.
  3. South (as south is at the bottom of typical maps).
    I went down to Miami for a conference.
  4. (Ireland) Away from the city (even if the location is to the North).
    He went down to Cavan.  down on the farm;  down country
  5. Into a state of non-operation.
    The computer has been shut down.  They closed the shop down.  The up escalator is down.
  6. (rail transport) The direction leading away from the principal terminus, away from milepost zero.
  7. (sentence substitute) Get down.
    Down, boy! (said to a dog)
  8. (UK, academia) Away from Oxford or Cambridge.
    He's gone back down to Newcastle for Christmas.
  9. From a remoter or higher antiquity.
  10. From a greater to a less bulk, or from a thinner to a thicker consistence.
    to boil down in cookery, or in making decoctions
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Arbuthnot to this entry?)
  11. From less to greater detail.
  12. (intensifier) Used with verbs to add emphasis to the action of the verb.
    They tamped (down) the asphalt to get a better bond.
  13. Used with verbs to indicate that the action of the verb was carried to some state of completion, rather than being of indefinite duration.
    He boiled the mixture./He boiled down the mixture. He sat waiting./He sat down and waited.
Usage notes
Antonyms
Translations

Preposition

down

  1. From the higher end to the lower of.
    The ball rolled down the hill.
  2. From one end to another of.
    The bus went down the street.
    They walked down the beach holding hands.
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

down (comparative more down, superlative most down)

  1. Depressed, feeling low.
    So, things got you down? / Is Rodney Dangerfield giving you no respect? / Well, bunky, cheer up!
  2. On a lower level than before.
    The stock market is down.
    Prices are down.
  3. Having a lower score than an opponent.
    They are down by 3-0 with just 5 minutes to play.
    He was down by a bishop and a pawn after 15 moves.
    At 5-1 down, she produced a great comeback to win the set on a tiebreak.
  4. (baseball, colloquial, following the noun modified) Out.
    Two down and one to go in the
    Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 3
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English - Etymology 3

From Old Norse _dún_. Cognate with Saterland Frisian _Duune_ (“fluff, down”). NOUN DOWN (_countable and uncountable_, _plural_ DOWNS) * Soft, fluffy immature feathers which grow on young birds. Used as insulating material in duvets, sleeping bags and jackets. * (botany) The pubescence of plants; the hairy crown or envelope of the seeds of certain plants, such as the thistle. * The soft hair of the face when beginning to appear. * Dryden The first DOWN begins to shade his face. * That which is made of down, as a bed or pillow; that which affords ease and repose, like a bed of down. * Tennyson When in the DOWN I sink my head, / Sleep, Death's twin brother, times my breath. * Southern Thou bosom softness, DOWN of all my cares! TRANSLATIONS VERB DOWN (_third-person singular simple present_ DOWNS, _present participle_ DOWNING, _simple past and past participle_ DOWNED) * (transitive) To cover, ornament, line, or stuff with down. (Can we find and add a quotation of Young to this entry?)

From Old Norse dún. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Duune (fluff, down).

Noun

down (countable and uncountable, plural downs)

  1. Soft, fluffy immature feathers which grow on young birds. Used as insulating material in duvets, sleeping bags and jackets.
  2. (botany) The pubescence of plants; the hairy crown or envelope of the seeds of certain plants, such as the thistle.
  3. The soft hair of the face when beginning to appear.
  4. That which is made of down, as a bed or pillow; that which affords ease and repose, like a bed of down.
Translations

Verb

down (third-person singular simple present downs, present participle downing, simple past and past participle downed)

  1. (transitive) To cover, ornament, line, or stuff with down.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Young to this entry?)

Que a categoria em DUTCH - ETYMOLOGY
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Dutch - Etymology

From English _down_.

From English down.

Que a categoria em DUTCH - PRONUNCIATION
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Dutch - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /dɑu̯n/

  • IPA(key): /dɑu̯n/

Que a categoria em DUTCH - ADJECTIVE
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Dutch - Adjective

DOWN (_used only predicatively_, _comparative_ MEER DOWN, _superlative_ MEEST DOWN) * Down, depressed. SYNONYMS * depressief, depri

down (used only predicatively, comparative meer down, superlative meest down)

  1. Down, depressed.

Synonyms

Que a categoria em DUTCH - ANAGRAMS
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Dutch - Anagrams

* wond

Que a categoria em GERMAN - ETYMOLOGY
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German - Etymology

From English _down_.

From English down.

Que a categoria em GERMAN - ADJECTIVE
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German - Adjective

DOWN (_not comparable_) * Down, depressed. DECLENSION

down (not comparable)

  1. Down, depressed.

Declension

Que a categoria em GERMAN - EXTERNAL LINKS
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German - External Links

* down in _Duden_ online

Que a categoria em WELSH - ALTERNATIVE FORMS
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Welsh - Alternative Forms

* dawn (colloquial first-person plural future) * delwn (colloquial first-person singular conditional) * deswn (colloquial first-person singular conditional) * dethwn (colloquial first-person singular conditional) * deuwn (literary; all forms)

Que a categoria em WELSH - VERB
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Welsh - Verb

DOWN * first-person plural present / future of _dod_ * first-person singular imperfect / conditional of _dod_ * (literary) first-person plural imperative of _dod_

down

  1. first-person plural present / future of dod
  2. first-person singular imperfect / conditional of dod
  3. (literary) first-person plural imperative of dod


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