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Tem 4 letras ( f e e l )         2 vogais ( e e )         2 consoantes ( f l )         Palavra ao contrário leef

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /fiːl/ * Rhymes: -iːl

  • IPA(key): /fiːl/
  • Rhymes: -iːl

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _felen_, from Old English _fēlan_ (“to feel, perceive, touch”), from Proto-Germanic _*fōlijaną_ (“to taste, feel”), from Proto-Indo-European _*pelem-_, _*pal-_ (“to swing, shake”). Cognate with Scots _fele_ (“to feel”), West Frisian _fiele_ (“to sense, feel”), Dutch _voelen_ (“to feel”), Low German _fölen_ (“to feel”), _föhlen_, German _fühlen_ (“to feel”), Danish _føle_ (“to feel”), and through Indo-European, with Latin _palpō_ (“touch, feel, caress, pat”), Ancient Greek _πάλλω_ (pállō, “swing, shake, shake loose”). VERB FEEL (_third-person singular simple present_ FEELS, _present participle_ FEELING, _simple past and past participle_ FELT) * (heading) _To use the sense of touch._ * (transitive, copulative) To become aware of through the skin; to use the sense of touch on. _You can FEEL a heartbeat if you put your fingers on your breast._ _I FELT downright hot and miserable evening at night._ * (transitive) To find one's way (literally or figuratively) by touching or using cautious movements. _I FELT my way through the darkened room._ _I FELT my way cautiously through the dangerous business maneuver._ * (intransitive) To receive information by touch or by any neurons other than those responsible for sight, smell, taste, or hearing. * (intransitive) To search by sense of touch. _He FELT for the light switch in the dark._ * (heading) _To sense or think emotionally or judgmentally._ * (transitive) To experience an emotion or other mental state about. _I can FEEL the sadness in his poems._ * Alexander Pope (1688-1744) Teach me to FEEL another's woe. * 1915, Emerson Hough, _The Purchase Price_, chapterI: Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, FELT a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. * (transitive) To think, believe, or have an impression concerning. _I FEEL that we need to try harder._ * William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Garlands […] which I FEEL / I am not worthy yet to wear. * (intransitive, copulative) To experience an emotion or other mental state. _He obviously FEELS strongly about it._ _She FELT even more upset when she heard the details._ * (intransitive) To sympathise; to have the sensibilities moved or affected. _I FEEL for you and your plight._ * Edmund Burke (1729-1797) [She] FEELS with the dignity of a Roman matron. * Alexander Pope (1688-1744) who FEEL for all mankind * (transitive) To be or become aware of. * (transitive) To experience the consequences of. _FEEL my wrath!_ * (copulative) To seem (through touch or otherwise). _It looks like wood, but it FEELS more like plastic._ _This is supposed to be a party, but it FEELS more like a funeral!_ * (transitive, US, slang) To understand. _I don't want you back here, ya FEEL me?_ USAGE NOTES * Most prescriptive grammarians prefer "I feel bad" to "I feel badly", but "I feel badly" is widely used in US English. * _Badly_ is sometimes used after _FEEL_ in its copulative sense where one might expect an adjective, ie, _bad_. * Some users use _badly_ when referring to an emotional state, and _bad_ when referring to a more physical or medical state. * Adjectives to which "feel" is often applied as a copula: free, cold, cool, warm, hot, young, old, good, great, fine, happy, glad, satisfied, excited, bad, depressed, unhappy, sad, blue, sorry, smart, stupid, loved, appreciated, accepted, rejected, lonely, isolated, insulted, offended, slighted, cheated, shy, refreshed, tired, exhausted, calm, relaxed, angry, annoyed, frustrated,

From Middle English felen, from Old English fēlan (to feel, perceive, touch), from Proto-Germanic *fōlijaną (to taste, feel), from Proto-Indo-European *pelem-, *pal- (to swing, shake). Cognate with Scots fele (to feel), West Frisian fiele (to sense, feel), Dutch voelen (to feel), Low German fölen (to feel), föhlen, German fühlen (to feel), Danish føle (to feel), and through Indo-European, with Latin palpō (touch, feel, caress, pat), Ancient Greek πάλλω (pállō, swing, shake, shake loose).

Verb

feel (third-person singular simple present feels, present participle feeling, simple past and past participle felt)

  1. (heading) To use the sense of touch.
    1. (transitive, copulative) To become aware of through the skin; to use the sense of touch on.
      You can feel a heartbeat if you put your fingers on your breast.
      I felt downright hot and miserable evening at night.
    2. (transitive) To find one's way (literally or figuratively) by touching or using cautious movements.
      I felt my way through the darkened room.
      I felt my way cautiously through the dangerous business maneuver.
    3. (intransitive) To receive information by touch or by any neurons other than those responsible for sight, smell, taste, or hearing.
    4. (intransitive) To search by sense of touch.
      He felt for the light switch in the dark.
  2. (heading) To sense or think emotionally or judgmentally.
    1. (transitive) To experience an emotion or other mental state about.
      I can feel the sadness in his poems.
    2. (transitive) To think, believe, or have an impression concerning.
      I feel that we need to try harder.
    3. (intransitive, copulative) To experience an emotion or other mental state.
      He obviously feels strongly about it.
      She felt even more upset when she heard the details.
    4. (intransitive) To sympathise; to have the sensibilities moved or affected.
      I feel for you and your plight.
  3. (transitive) To be or become aware of.
  4. (transitive) To experience the consequences of.
    Feel my wrath!
  5. (copulative) To seem (through touch or otherwise).
    It looks like wood, but it feels more like plastic.
    This is supposed to be a party, but it feels more like a funeral!
  6. (transitive, US, slang) To understand.
    I don't want you back here, ya feel me?
Usage notes

English - Anagrams

* fele, flee

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology 2

From Middle English _feele_, _fele_, _feole_, from Old English _fela_, _feala_, _feolo_ (“much, many”), from Proto-Germanic _*felu_ (“very, much”), from Proto-Indo-European _*pélu-_ (“many”). Cognate with Scots _fele_ (“much, many, great”), Dutch _veel_ (“much, many”), German _viel_ (“much, many”), Latin _plūs_ (“more”), Ancient Greek _πολύς_ (polús, “many”). Related to full. PRONOUN FEEL * (dialectal or obsolete) alternative form of _fele_ ADJECTIVE FEEL (_not comparable_) * alternative form of _fele_ ADVERB FEEL (_not comparable_) * alternative form of _fele_

From Middle English feele, fele, feole, from Old English fela, feala, feolo (much, many), from Proto-Germanic *felu (very, much), from Proto-Indo-European *pélu- (many). Cognate with Scots fele (much, many, great), Dutch veel (much, many), German viel (much, many), Latin plūs (more), Ancient Greek πολύς (polús, many). Related to full.

Pronoun

feel

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) alternative form of fele

Adjective

feel (not comparable)

  1. alternative form of fele

Adverb

feel (not comparable)

  1. alternative form of fele

Que a categoria em SERI - NOUN
Informações sobre o assunto

Seri - Noun

FEEL (_plural_ FEELOJ) * mallard, _Anas platyrhynchos_

feel (plural feeloj)

  1. mallard, Anas platyrhynchos


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