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heavy   
      

Tem 5 letras ( h e a v y )         2 vogais ( e a )         3 consoantes ( h v y )         Palavra ao contrário yvaeh

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _hevy_, _heviȝ_, from Old English _hefiġ_, _hefeġ_, _hæfiġ_ (“heavy; important, grave, severe, serious; oppressive, grievous; slow, dull”), from Proto-Germanic _*habīgaz_ (“heavy, hefty, weighty”), from Proto-Indo-European _*keh₂p-_ (“to take, grasp, hold”), equivalent to _heave_ +‎ _-y_. Cognate with Scots _hevy_, _havy_, _heavy_ (“heavy”), Dutch _hevig_ (“violent, severe, intense, acute”), Middle Low German _hēvich_ (“violent, fierce, intense”), German _hebig_ (compare _heftig_ (“fierce, severe, intense, violent, heavy”)), Icelandic _höfugur_ (“heavy, weighty, important”), Latin _capāx_ (“large, wide, roomy, spacious, capacious, capable, apt”). PRONUNCIATION * enPR: hev'i, IPA(key): /ˈhɛvi/ * Rhymes: -ɛvi ADJECTIVE HEAVY (_comparative_ HEAVIER, _superlative_ HEAVIEST) * (of a physical object) Having great weight. * (of a topic) Serious, somber. * Not easy to bear; burdensome; oppressive. _HEAVY yokes, expenses, undertakings, trials, news, etc._ * Bible, 1 Sam. v. 6 The hand of the Lord was HEAVY upon them of Ashdod. * Shakespeare The king himself hath a HEAVY reckoning to make. * Wordsworth Sent hither to impart the HEAVY news. * (UK, slang, dated) Good. _This film is HEAVY._ * (dated, late 1960s, 1970s, US) Profound. _The Moody Blues are, like, HEAVY._ * (of a rate of flow) High, great. * (slang) Armed. _Come HEAVY, or not at all._ * (music) Louder, more distorted. _Metal is HEAVIER than swing._ * (of weather) Hot and humid. * (of a person) Doing the specified activity more intensely than most other people. _He was a HEAVY sleeper, a HEAVY eater and a HEAVY smoker - certainly not an ideal husband._ * (of food) High in fat or protein; difficult to digest. _Cheese-stuffed sausage is too HEAVY to eat before exercising._ * Of great force, power, or intensity; deep or intense. * 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter IV The surf was not HEAVY, and there was no undertow, so we made shore easily, effecting an equally easy landing. _it was a HEAVY storm;  a HEAVY slumber in bed;  a HEAVY punch_ * Laden to a great extent. _his eyes were HEAVY with sleep;  she was HEAVY with child_ * Laden with that which is weighty; encumbered; burdened; bowed down, either with an actual burden, or with grief, pain, disappointment, etc. * Chapman The HEAVY [sorrowing] nobles all in council were. * Shakespeare A light wife doth make a HEAVY husband. * William Browne Seating himselfe within a darkesome cave, / (Such places HEAVY Saturnists doe crave,) / Where yet the gladsome day was never seene […] * Slow; sluggish; inactive; or lifeless, dull, inanimate, stupid. _a HEAVY gait, looks, manners, style, etc._ _a HEAVY writer or book_ * Shakespeare whilst the HEAVY ploughman snores * Dryden a HEAVY, dull, degenerate mind * Bible, Is. lix. 1 Neither [is] his ear HEAVY, that it cannot hear. * Impeding motion; cloggy; clayey. _a HEAVY road; a HEAVY soil_ * Not raised or leavened. _HEAVY bread_ * Having much body or strength; said of wines or spirits. * (obsolete) With child; pregnant. SYNONYMS * sweer/swear DERIVED TERMS Look at pages starting with heavy. TRANSLATIONS ADVERB HEAVY (_comparative_ MORE HEAVY, _superlative_ MOST HEAVY) * heavily _HEAVY laden with their sins_ * (India, colloquial) very NOUN HEAVY (_plural_ HEAVYS _or_ HEAVIES) * A villain or bad guy; the one responsible for evil or aggressive acts. _With his wrinkled, uneven face, the actor always seemed to play the HEAVY in films._ * (slang) A doorman, bouncer or bodyguard. _A fight started outside the bar but the HEAVIES came out and stopped it._ * (aviation) A large multi-engined aircraft. The term _heavy_ normally follows the call-sign when used by air traffic controllers. TRANSLATIONS VERB HEAVY (_third-person singular simple present_ HEAVIES

From Middle English hevy, heviȝ, from Old English hefiġ, hefeġ, hæfiġ (heavy; important, grave, severe, serious; oppressive, grievous; slow, dull), from Proto-Germanic *habīgaz (heavy, hefty, weighty), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂p- (to take, grasp, hold), equivalent to heave +‎ -y. Cognate with Scots hevy, havy, heavy (heavy), Dutch hevig (violent, severe, intense, acute), Middle Low German hēvich (violent, fierce, intense), German hebig (compare heftig (fierce, severe, intense, violent, heavy)), Icelandic höfugur (heavy, weighty, important), Latin capāx (large, wide, roomy, spacious, capacious, capable, apt).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hev'i, IPA(key): /ˈhɛvi/
  • Rhymes: -ɛvi

Adjective

heavy (comparative heavier, superlative heaviest)

  1. (of a physical object) Having great weight.
  2. (of a topic) Serious, somber.
  3. Not easy to bear; burdensome; oppressive.
    heavy yokes, expenses, undertakings, trials, news, etc.
  4. (UK, slang, dated) Good.
    This film is heavy.
  5. (dated, late 1960s, 1970s, US) Profound.
    The Moody Blues are, like, heavy.
  6. (of a rate of flow) High, great.
  7. (slang) Armed.
    Come heavy, or not at all.
  8. (music) Louder, more distorted.
    Metal is heavier than swing.
  9. (of weather) Hot and humid.
  10. (of a person) Doing the specified activity more intensely than most other people.
    He was a heavy sleeper, a heavy eater and a heavy smoker - certainly not an ideal husband.
  11. (of food) High in fat or protein; difficult to digest.
    Cheese-stuffed sausage is too heavy to eat before exercising.
  12. Of great force, power, or intensity; deep or intense.
    it was a heavy storm;  a heavy slumber in bed;  a heavy punch
  13. Laden to a great extent.
    his eyes were heavy with sleep;  she was heavy with child
  14. Laden with that which is weighty; encumbered; burdened; bowed down, either with an actual burden, or with grief, pain, disappointment, etc.
  15. Slow; sluggish; inactive; or lifeless, dull, inanimate, stupid.
    a heavy gait, looks, manners, style, etc.
    a heavy writer or book
  16. Impeding motion; cloggy; clayey.
    a heavy road; a heavy soil
  17. Not raised or leavened.
    heavy bread
  18. Having much body or strength; said of wines or spirits.
  19. (obsolete) With child; pregnant.
Synonyms
  • sweer/swear
Derived terms

Look at pages starting with heavy.

Translations

Adverb

heavy (comparative more heavy, superlative most heavy)

  1. heavily
    heavy laden with their sins
  2. (India, colloquial) very

Noun

heavy (plural heavys or heavies)

  1. A villain or bad guy; the one responsible for evil or aggressive acts.
    With his wrinkled, uneven face, the actor always seemed to play the heavy in films.
  2. (slang) A doorman, bouncer or bodyguard.
    A fight started outside the bar but the heavies came out and stopped it.
  3. (aviation) A large multi-engined aircraft.
    The term heavy normally follows the call-sign when used by air traffic controllers.
Translations

Verb

heavy (third-person singular simple present heavies

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology 2

_heave_ +‎ _-y_ ADJECTIVE HEAVY (_comparative_ MORE HEAVY, _superlative_ MOST HEAVY) * Having the heaves. _a HEAVY horse_

heave +‎ -y

Adjective

heavy (comparative more heavy, superlative most heavy)

  1. Having the heaves.
    a heavy horse

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