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Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ALTERNATIVE FORMS
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English - Alternative Forms

* (obsolete) knolege, knowlage, knowleche, knowledg, knowlege, knowliche, knowlych, knowlech * (obsolete, uncommon, Scottish) knaulege, knaulage, knawlage * (obsolete, uncommon) knoleche, knoleige, knowlache, knolych * (obsolete, verb) knawlache

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
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English - Etymology

From Middle English _knowleche_ (“knowledge”), of uncertain formation. The first element is ultimately identical with _know_, but the second is obscure (neither Old Norse _-leikr_ nor Old English _-lāċ_ would have given _-leche_ as found in the earliest Middle English citations). Compare Middle English _knowlechen_ (“to acknowledge”), Old English _cnāwelǣċing_, _cnāwlǣċ_ (“acknowledgment”), and _know_. Compare also _freeledge_. * The noun originally provided a counterpart to the now-obsolete verb _to knowledge_ (see below), but was very early adapted to be the noun equivalent of _know_.

From Middle English knowleche (knowledge), of uncertain formation. The first element is ultimately identical with know, but the second is obscure (neither Old Norse -leikr nor Old English -lāċ would have given -leche as found in the earliest Middle English citations). Compare Middle English knowlechen (to acknowledge), Old English cnāwelǣċing, cnāwlǣċ (acknowledgment), and know. Compare also freeledge.

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* (UK) enPR: nŏ′lij, IPA(key): /ˈnɒlɪdʒ/ * (US) enPR: nŏl′ij, IPA(key): /ˈnɑlɪdʒ/ * Rhymes: -ɒlɪdʒ * Hyphenation US: knowl‧edge UK: know‧ledge

  • (UK) enPR: nŏ′lij, IPA(key): /ˈnɒlɪdʒ/
  • (US) enPR: nŏl′ij, IPA(key): /ˈnɑlɪdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒlɪdʒ
  • Hyphenation US: knowl‧edge UK: know‧ledge

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - NOUN
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English - Noun

KNOWLEDGE (_usually uncountable_, _plural_ KNOWLEDGES) * (obsolete) Acknowledgement. [14th-16th c.] * The fact of knowing about something; general understanding or familiarity with a subject, place, situation etc. [from 14th c.] _His KNOWLEDGE of Iceland was limited to what he'd seen on the Travel Channel._ * Awareness of a particular fact or situation; a state of having been informed or made aware of something. [from 14th c.] * 1813, Jane Austen, _Pride and Prejudice_: He had always intended to visit him, though to the last always assuring his wife that he should not go; and till the evening after the visit was paid she had no KNOWLEDGE of it. * Intellectual understanding; the state of appreciating truth or information. [from 14th c.] _KNOWLEDGE consists in recognizing the difference between good and bad decisions._ * Familiarity or understanding of a particular skill, branch of learning etc. [from 14th c.] _Does your friend have any KNOWLEDGE of hieroglyphs, perchance?_ * (archaic or law) Sexual intimacy or intercourse (now usually in phrase _carnal knowledge_). [from 15th c.] * 1573, George Gascoigne, "The Adventures of Master F.J.", _An Anthology of Elizabethan Prose Fiction_: Every time that he had KNOWLEDGE of her he would leave, either in the bed, or in her cushion-cloth, or by her looking-glass, or in some place where she must needs find it, a piece of money […]. * (obsolete) Information or intelligence about something; notice. [15th-18th c.] * 1580, Edward Hayes, "Sir Humphrey Gilbert's Voyage to Newfoundland", _Voyages and Travels Ancient and Modern_, ed. Charles W Eliot, Cosimo 2005, p. 280: Item, if any ship be in danger […], every man to bear towards her, answering her with one light for a short time, and so to put it out again; thereby to give KNOWLEDGE that they have seen her token. * The total of what is known; all information and products of learning. [from 16th c.] _His library contained the accumulated KNOWLEDGE of the Greeks and Romans._ * (countable) Something that can be known; a branch of learning; a piece of information; a science. [from 16th c.] * 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, _Essays_, II.12: he weakened his braines much, as all men doe, who over nicely and greedily will search out those KNOWLEDGES [transl. _cognoissances_], which hang not for their mowing, nor pertaine unto them. * Francis Bacon There is a great difference in the delivery of the mathematics, which are the most abstracted of KNOWLEDGES. * (obsolete) Notice, awareness. [17th c.] * 1611, The Bible, Authorized Version, Ruth II.10: Then she fell on her face, and bowed herself to the ground, and said unto him, Why have I found grace in thine eyes, that thou shouldest take KNOWLEDGE of me, seeing I am a stranger? * (UK, informal) The deep familiarity with certain routes and places of interest required by taxicab drivers working in London, England. * Malcolm Bobbitt, _Taxi! - The Story of the London Cab_ There is only one sure way to memorise the runs and that is to follow them, either on foot, cycle or motor cycle; hence, the familiar sight of would-be cabbies learning the KNOWLEDGE during evenings and weekends. QUOTATIONS * 1996, Jan Jindy Pettman, _Worlding Women: A feminist international politics_, pages ix-x: There are by now many feminisms (Tong, 1989; Humm, 1992). […] They are in shifting alliance or contest with postmodern critiques, which at times seem to threaten the very category 'women' and its possibilities for a feminist politics. These debates inform this attempt at worlding women—moving beyond white western power centres and their dominant KNOWLEDGES […]. USAGE NOTES * Adjectives often used with “knowledge”: extensive, deep, superficial, theoretical, practical, useful, working, encyclopedic, public, private, scientific, tacit, explicit, general, specialized,

knowledge (usually uncountable, plural knowledges)

  1. (obsolete) Acknowledgement. [14th-16th c.]
  2. The fact of knowing about something; general understanding or familiarity with a subject, place, situation etc. [from 14th c.]
    His knowledge of Iceland was limited to what he'd seen on the Travel Channel.
  3. Awareness of a particular fact or situation; a state of having been informed or made aware of something. [from 14th c.]
  4. Intellectual understanding; the state of appreciating truth or information. [from 14th c.]
    Knowledge consists in recognizing the difference between good and bad decisions.
  5. Familiarity or understanding of a particular skill, branch of learning etc. [from 14th c.]
    Does your friend have any knowledge of hieroglyphs, perchance?
  6. (archaic or law) Sexual intimacy or intercourse (now usually in phrase carnal knowledge). [from 15th c.]
  7. (obsolete) Information or intelligence about something; notice. [15th-18th c.]
  8. The total of what is known; all information and products of learning. [from 16th c.]
    His library contained the accumulated knowledge of the Greeks and Romans.
  9. (countable) Something that can be known; a branch of learning; a piece of information; a science. [from 16th c.]
  10. (obsolete) Notice, awareness. [17th c.]
  11. (UK, informal) The deep familiarity with certain routes and places of interest required by taxicab drivers working in London, England.

Quotations

Usage notes

English - Verb

KNOWLEDGE (_third-person singular simple present_ KNOWLEDGES, _present participle_ KNOWLEDGING, _simple past and past participle_ KNOWLEDGED) * (obsolete) To confess as true; to acknowledge. [13th-17th c.] * 1526, _Bible_, tr. William Tyndale, Matthew 3: Then went oute to hym Jerusalem, and all Jury, and all the region rounde aboute Jordan, and were baptised of hym in Jordan, KNOLEDGING their synnes. SEE ALSO * data * erudition * information * know-how * perception * wisdom EXTERNAL LINKS * knowledge in _Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary_, G. & C. Merriam, 1913 * knowledge in _The Century Dictionary_, The Century Co., New York, 1911

knowledge (third-person singular simple present knowledges, present participle knowledging, simple past and past participle knowledged)

  1. (obsolete) To confess as true; to acknowledge. [13th-17th c.]

See also

External links

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