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Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _leed_, from Old English _lēad_ (“lead”), from Proto-Germanic _*laudą_ (“lead”), from Proto-Indo-European _*lAudh-_ (“lead”). Cognate with Scots _leid_, _lede_ (“lead”), North Frisian _lud_, _luad_ (“lead”), West Frisian _lead_ (“lead”), Dutch _lood_ (“lead”), German _Lot_ (“solder, plummet, sounding line”), Swedish _lod_ (“lead”), Icelandic _lóð_ (“a plumb, weight”), Irish _luaidhe_ (“lead”). Alternative etymology suggests the possibility that Proto-Germanic *_laudą_ may derive from Proto-Celtic _*loudhom_, from an assumed Proto-Italo-Celtic *_ploudhom_, from Proto-Indo-European _*plou(d)-_ (“to flow”). If so, then cognate with Latin _plumbum_ (“lead”). More at flow. PRONUNCIATION * enPR: lĕd, IPA(key): /lɛd/ * Homophone: led NOUN LEAD (_countable and uncountable_, _plural_ LEADS) * (uncountable) A heavy, pliable, inelastic metal element, having a bright, bluish color, but easily tarnished; both malleable and ductile, though with little tenacity. It is easily fusible, forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of solder and type metal. Atomic number 82, symbol Pb (from Latin _plumbum_). * (countable) A plummet or mass of lead attached to a line, used in sounding depth at sea or (dated) to estimate velocity in knots. * A thin strip of type metal, used to separate lines of type in printing. * (uncountable, typography) Vertical space in advance of a row or between rows of text. Also known as _leading_. _This copy has too much lead; I prefer less space between the lines._ * Sheets or plates of lead used as a covering for roofs. * (plural LEADS) A roof covered with lead sheets or terne plates. * I would have the tower two stories, and goodly leads upon the top. — Bacon * (countable) A thin cylinder of black lead or plumbago (graphite) used in pencils. * (slang) Bullets; ammunition. _They pumped him full of LEAD._ DERIVED TERMS TRANSLATIONS VERB LEAD (_third-person singular simple present_ LEADS, _present participle_ LEADING, _simple past and past participle_ LEADED) * (transitive) To cover, fill, or affect with lead; as, continuous firing leads the grooves of a rifle. * (transitive, printing) To place leads between the lines of; as, to lead a page; leaded matter. USAGE NOTES Note carefully these two senses are verbs derived from the noun referring to the metallic element, and are unrelated to the heteronym defined below under #Etymology 2. TRANSLATIONS SEE ALSO EXTERNAL LINKS * LEAD on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

From Middle English leed, from Old English lēad (lead), from Proto-Germanic *laudą (lead), from Proto-Indo-European *lAudh- (lead). Cognate with Scots leid, lede (lead), North Frisian lud, luad (lead), West Frisian lead (lead), Dutch lood (lead), German Lot (solder, plummet, sounding line), Swedish lod (lead), Icelandic lóð (a plumb, weight), Irish luaidhe (lead).

Alternative etymology suggests the possibility that Proto-Germanic *laudą may derive from Proto-Celtic *loudhom, from an assumed Proto-Italo-Celtic *ploudhom, from Proto-Indo-European *plou(d)- (to flow). If so, then cognate with Latin plumbum (lead). More at flow.

Pronunciation

Noun

lead (countable and uncountable, plural leads)

  1. (uncountable) A heavy, pliable, inelastic metal element, having a bright, bluish color, but easily tarnished; both malleable and ductile, though with little tenacity. It is easily fusible, forms alloys with other metals, and is an ingredient of solder and type metal. Atomic number 82, symbol Pb (from Latin plumbum).
  2. (countable) A plummet or mass of lead attached to a line, used in sounding depth at sea or (dated) to estimate velocity in knots.
  3. A thin strip of type metal, used to separate lines of type in printing.
  4. (uncountable, typography) Vertical space in advance of a row or between rows of text. Also known as leading.
    This copy has too much lead; I prefer less space between the lines.
  5. Sheets or plates of lead used as a covering for roofs.
  6. (plural leads) A roof covered with lead sheets or terne plates.
  7. (countable) A thin cylinder of black lead or plumbago (graphite) used in pencils.
  8. (slang) Bullets; ammunition.
    They pumped him full of lead.
Derived terms


Translations

Verb

lead (third-person singular simple present leads, present participle leading, simple past and past participle leaded)

  1. (transitive) To cover, fill, or affect with lead; as, continuous firing leads the grooves of a rifle.
  2. (transitive, printing) To place leads between the lines of; as, to lead a page; leaded matter.
Usage notes

Note carefully these two senses are verbs derived from the noun referring to the metallic element, and are unrelated to the heteronym defined below under #Etymology 2.

Translations

See also

External links

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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English - Etymology 2

Wikipedia From Middle English _leden_, from Old English _lǣdan_ (“to lead”), from Proto-Germanic _*laidijaną_ (“to cause one to go, lead”), causative of Proto-Germanic _*līþaną_ (“to go”), from Proto-Indo-European _*leit-_, _*leith-_ (“to leave, die”). Cognate with West Frisian _liede_ (“to lead”), Dutch _leiden_ (“to lead”), German _leiten_ (“to lead”), Danish _lede_ (“to lead”), Swedish _leda_ (“to lead”). Related to Old English _līþan_ (“to go, travel”). PRONUNCIATION * enPR: lēd, IPA(key): /liːd/ * Homophones: leed, lede VERB LEAD (_third-person singular simple present_ LEADS, _present participle_ LEADING, _simple past and past participle_ LED) * (heading, transitive) _To guide or conduct._ * To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some physical contact connection. _a father LEADS a child;  a jockey LEADS a horse with a halter;  a dog LEADS a blind man_ * John Wycliffe on _Matthew 15:14_ If a blind man LEAD a blind man, both fall down in the ditch. * _Luke 4:29_ They thrust him out of the city, and LED him unto the brow of the hill. * John Milton (1608-1674) In thy right hand LEAD with thee / The mountain nymph, sweet Liberty. * To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain place or end, by making the way known; to show the way, especially by going with or going in advance of, to lead a pupil; to guide somebody somewhere or to bring somebody somewhere by means of.instructions. Hence, figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to lead a traveler. * _Exodus 13:21_ The Lord went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to LEAD them the way. * _Psalms 23:2_ He LEADETH me beside the still waters. * John Milton (1608-1674) This thought might LEAD me through the world’s vain mask. Content, though blind, had I no better guide. * To conduct or direct with authority; to have direction or charge of; as, to lead an army, an exploring party, or a search; to lead a political party; to command, especially a military or business unit. * Robert South (1634–1716) Christ took not upon him flesh and blood that he might conquer and rule nations, LEAD armies, or possess places. * To guide or conduct oneself in, through, or along (a certain course); hence, to proceed in the way of; to follow the path or course of; to pass; to spend. Also, to cause (one) to proceed or follow in (a certain course). _The evidence LEADS me to believe he is guilty._ * _1 Timothy 2:2_ That we may LEAD a quiet and peaceable life. * 1849, Alfred Tennyson, In Memoriam A.H.H, XXXIII Nor thou with shadow'd hint confuse / A life that LEADS melodious days. * 1849-50, Charles Dickens, _David Copperfield, Chapter 61_ You remember […] the life he used to LEAD his wife and daughter. * (intransitive) To guide or conduct, as by accompanying, going before, showing, influencing, directing with authority, etc.; to have precedence or preeminence; to be first or chief; — used in most of the senses of the transitive verb. * (heading) _To begin, to be ahead._ * (transitive) To go or to be in advance of; to precede; hence, to be foremost or chief among. _the big sloop LED the fleet of yachts;  the Guards LED the attack;  Demosthenes LEADS the orators of all ages_ * 1600, Edward Fairfax, The _Jerusalem Delivered_ of Tasso As Hesperus, that LEADS the sun his way. * Leigh Hunt (1784-1859) And lo! Ben Adhem's name LED all the rest. * (intransitive) To lead off or out, to go first; to begin. * (intransitive) To be more advanced in technology o

Wikipedia

From Middle English leden, from Old English lǣdan (to lead), from Proto-Germanic *laidijaną (to cause one to go, lead), causative of Proto-Germanic *līþaną (to go), from Proto-Indo-European *leit-, *leith- (to leave, die). Cognate with West Frisian liede (to lead), Dutch leiden (to lead), German leiten (to lead), Danish lede (to lead), Swedish leda (to lead). Related to Old English līþan (to go, travel).

Pronunciation

Verb

lead (third-person singular simple present leads, present participle leading, simple past and past participle led)

  1. (heading, transitive) To guide or conduct.
    1. To guide or conduct with the hand, or by means of some physical contact connection.
      a father leads a child;  a jockey leads a horse with a halter;  a dog leads a blind man
    2. To guide or conduct in a certain course, or to a certain place or end, by making the way known; to show the way, especially by going with or going in advance of, to lead a pupil; to guide somebody somewhere or to bring somebody somewhere by means of.instructions. Hence, figuratively: To direct; to counsel; to instruct; as, to lead a traveler.
    3. To conduct or direct with authority; to have direction or charge of; as, to lead an army, an exploring party, or a search; to lead a political party; to command, especially a military or business unit.
    4. To guide or conduct oneself in, through, or along (a certain course); hence, to proceed in the way of; to follow the path or course of; to pass; to spend. Also, to cause (one) to proceed or follow in (a certain course).
      The evidence leads me to believe he is guilty.
  2. (intransitive) To guide or conduct, as by accompanying, going before, showing, influencing, directing with authority, etc.; to have precedence or preeminence; to be first or chief; — used in most of the senses of the transitive verb.
  3. (heading) To begin, to be ahead.
    1. (transitive) To go or to be in advance of; to precede; hence, to be foremost or chief among.
      the big sloop led the fleet of yachts;  the Guards led the attack;  Demosthenes leads the orators of all ages
    2. (intransitive) To lead off or out, to go first; to begin.
    3. (intransitive) To be more advanced in technology o

English - Etymology 3

VERB LEAD * Misspelling of _led_.

Verb

lead

  1. Misspelling of led.

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - REFERENCES
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English - References

* lead in _Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary_, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
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English - Anagrams

* Adel * dale, Dale * deal * E.D. La. * lade

Que a categoria em HUNGARIAN - ETYMOLOGY
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Hungarian - Etymology

_le-_ +‎ _ad_

le- +‎ ad

Que a categoria em HUNGARIAN - PRONUNCIATION
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Hungarian - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /ˈlɛɒd/ * Hyphenation: le‧ad

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛɒd/
  • Hyphenation: le‧ad

Que a categoria em HUNGARIAN - VERB
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Hungarian - Verb

LEAD * to pass down, hand down, turn in, drop off * to lose weight, usually as a result of some kind of training or exercise CONJUGATION DERIVED TERMS * leadja a voksát

lead

  1. to pass down, hand down, turn in, drop off
  2. to lose weight, usually as a result of some kind of training or exercise

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • leadja a voksát

Que a categoria em OLD ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
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Old English - Etymology

From Proto-Germanic _*laudą_.

From Proto-Germanic *laudą.

Que a categoria em OLD ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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Old English - Pronunciation

* Hyphenation: lē‧ad

  • Hyphenation: lē‧ad

Que a categoria em OLD ENGLISH - NOUN
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Old English - Noun

LĒAD n * LEAD (metal) DESCENDANTS * English: lead * Scots: leid

lēad n

  1. lead (metal)

Descendants


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