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mass   
      

Tem 4 letras ( m a s s )         1 vogais ( a )         3 consoantes ( m s s )         Palavra ao contrário ssam

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

In late Middle English (circa 1400) as _masse_ in the sense of "lump, quantity of matter", from Anglo-Norman _masse_, in Old French attested from the 11th century, via late Latin _massa_ (“lump, dough”), from Ancient Greek _μᾶζα_ (mâza, “barley-cake, lump (of dough)”). The Greek noun is derived from the verb _μάσσω_ (mássō, “to knead”), ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European _*mag'-_ (“to oil, knead”). The sense of "a large number or quantity" arises circa 1580. The scientific sense is from 1687 (as Latin _massa_) in the works of Isaac Newton, with the first English use (as MASS) occurring in 1704. PRONUNCIATION * IPA(key): /mæs/ * Rhymes: -æs NOUN MASS (_countable and uncountable_, _plural_ MASSES) * (physical) Matter, material. * A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively make one body or quantity, usually of considerable size; as, a mass of ore, metal, sand, or water. * 1718 [1704], Isaac Newton, Opticks, Second Edition: And if it were not for theſe Principles the Bodies of the Earth, Planets, Comets, Sun, and all things in them would grow cold and freeze, and become inactive MASSES ; […] . * 1821, George Buchanan (Latin original _Rerum Scoticarum Historia_, 1582), translator not named, _The History of Scotland, from the Earliest Accounts of that Nation, to the Reign of King James VI_, Volume 1, page 133, […] and because a deep MASS of continual sea is slower stirred to rage. * (obsolete) Precious metal, especially gold or silver. * 1596, Edmund Spenser, _The Faerie Queene_, IV.10: Right in the midst the Goddesse selfe did stand / Upon an altar of some costly MASSE […]. * (physics) The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume. It is one of four fundamental properties of matter. It is measured in kilograms in the SI system of measurement. * (pharmacy) A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills; as, blue mass. * (medicine) A palpable or visible abnormal globular structure; a tumor. * (bodybuilding) Excess body weight, especially in the form of muscle hypertrophy. * 1988, Steve Holman, "Christian Conquers Columbus", _Ironman_ 47 (6): 28-34. After all, muscle maniacs go "ga ga" over MASS no matter how it's presented. * A large quantity; a sum. * 1829, Sir Walter Raleigh, _The Works of Sir Walter Ralegh, Kt_, Volume VIII, […] he hath discovered to me the way to five or six of the richest mines which the Spaniard hath, and whence all the MASS of gold that comes into Spain in effect is drawn. * 1869, Alexander George Richey, _Lectures on the History of Ireland: Down to A. D. 1534_, page 204, For though he had spent a huge MASS of treasure in transporting his army, […] . * (quantity) Large in number. * Bulk; magnitude; body; size. * C.1599-1601, William Shakespeare, _The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark_, Act 4, Scene 4, Witness this army of such MASS and charge / Led by a delicate and tender prince, * The principal part; the main body. * 1881, Thucydides, Benjamin Jowett _Thucydides translated into English_, Volume 1, page 310, Night closed upon the pursuit, and aided the MASS of the fugitives in their escape. * A large body of individuals, especially persons. _The MASS of spectators didn't see the infraction on the field._ _A MASS of ships converged on the beaches of Dunkirk._ * (in the plural) The lower classes of persons. _The MASSES are revolting._ SEE ALSO * Customary units: slug, pound, ounce, long ton (1.12 short tons), short ton (commonly used) * Metric units: gram (g), kilogram (kg), metric ton DERIVED TERMS TRANSLATIONS VERB MASS (third-person singular

In late Middle English (circa 1400) as masse in the sense of "lump, quantity of matter", from Anglo-Norman masse, in Old French attested from the 11th century, via late Latin massa (lump, dough), from Ancient Greek μᾶζα (mâza, barley-cake, lump (of dough)). The Greek noun is derived from the verb μάσσω (mássō, to knead), ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European *mag'- (to oil, knead). The sense of "a large number or quantity" arises circa 1580. The scientific sense is from 1687 (as Latin massa) in the works of Isaac Newton, with the first English use (as mass) occurring in 1704.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mæs/
  • Rhymes: -æs

Noun

mass (countable and uncountable, plural masses)

  1. (physical) Matter, material.
    1. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively make one body or quantity, usually of considerable size; as, a mass of ore, metal, sand, or water.
    2. (obsolete) Precious metal, especially gold or silver.
    3. (physics) The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume. It is one of four fundamental properties of matter. It is measured in kilograms in the SI system of measurement.
    4. (pharmacy) A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills; as, blue mass.
    5. (medicine) A palpable or visible abnormal globular structure; a tumor.
    6. (bodybuilding) Excess body weight, especially in the form of muscle hypertrophy.
  2. A large quantity; a sum.
  3. (quantity) Large in number.
    1. Bulk; magnitude; body; size.
    2. The principal part; the main body.
    3. A large body of individuals, especially persons.
      The mass of spectators didn't see the infraction on the field.
      A mass of ships converged on the beaches of Dunkirk.
    4. (in the plural) The lower classes of persons.
      The masses are revolting.
See also
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

mass (third-person singular<

English - Etymology 2

From Middle English _masse_, from Old English _mæsse_ (“the mass, church festival”), from Vulgar Latin *_messa_, from Late Latin _missa_, noun use of feminine past participle of classical Latin _mittere_ (“to send”). Compare Dutch _mis_ (“mass”), German _Messe_ (“mass”), Danish _messe_ (“mass”), Icelandic _messa_ (“mass”). More at mission. PRONUNCIATION * Rhymes: -ɑːs * (US) IPA(key): /mæs/ * (UK) IPA(key): /mæs/, /mɑːs/ * Rhymes: -æs NOUN MASS (_plural_ MASSES) * (Christianity) The Eucharist, now especially in Roman Catholicism. * (Christianity) Celebration of the Eucharist. * (Christianity, usually as _the Mass_) The sacrament of the Eucharist. * A musical setting of parts of the mass. TRANSLATIONS VERB MASS (_third-person singular simple present_ MASSES, _present participle_ MASSING, _simple past and past participle_ MASSED) * (intransitive, obsolete) To celebrate mass. (Can we find and add a quotation of Hooker to this entry?) TRANSLATIONS EXTERNAL LINKS * mass in _Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary_, G. & C. Merriam, 1913 * mass in _The Century Dictionary_, The Century Co., New York, 1911

From Middle English masse, from Old English mæsse (the mass, church festival), from Vulgar Latin *messa, from Late Latin missa, noun use of feminine past participle of classical Latin mittere (to send). Compare Dutch mis (mass), German Messe (mass), Danish messe (mass), Icelandic messa (mass). More at mission.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑːs
  • (US) IPA(key): /mæs/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /mæs/, /mɑːs/
  • Rhymes: -æs

Noun

mass (plural masses)

  1. (Christianity) The Eucharist, now especially in Roman Catholicism.
  2. (Christianity) Celebration of the Eucharist.
  3. (Christianity, usually as the Mass) The sacrament of the Eucharist.
  4. A musical setting of parts of the mass.
Translations

Verb

mass (third-person singular simple present masses, present participle massing, simple past and past participle massed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To celebrate mass.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hooker to this entry?)
Translations

External links

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
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English - Anagrams

* ASMS * sams

Que a categoria em VÕRO - ETYMOLOGY 1
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Võro - Etymology 1

From Proto-Finnic _*maksa_, from Proto-Uralic _*mëksa_. NOUN MASS (_genitive_ MASSA, _partitive_ MASSA) * liver INFLECTION This noun needs an inflection-table template.

From Proto-Finnic *maksa, from Proto-Uralic *mëksa.

Noun

mass (genitive massa, partitive massa)

  1. liver
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Que a categoria em VÕRO - ETYMOLOGY 2
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Võro - Etymology 2

Related to Estonian _maks_. NOUN MASS (_genitive_ MASSU, _partitive_ MASSU) * tax, payment INFLECTION This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Related to Estonian maks.

Noun

mass (genitive massu, partitive massu)

  1. tax, payment
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


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