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Tem 4 letras ( m e e t )         2 vogais ( e e )         2 consoantes ( m t )         Palavra ao contrário teem

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _meten_, from Old English _mētan_ (“to meet, find, find out, fall in with, encounter, obtain”), from Proto-Germanic _*mōtijaną_ (“to meet”), from Proto-Indo-European _*mōd-_, _*mad-_ (“to come, meet”). Cognate with Scots _met_, _mete_, _meit_ (“to meet”), North Frisian _mete_ (“to meet”), West Frisian _moetsje_ (“to meet”), Dutch _ontmoeten_ (“to meet”), Low German, _möten_ (“to meet”), Danish _møde_ (“to meet”), Swedish _möta_ (“to meet”), Icelandic _mæta_ (“to meet”). Related to moot. PRONUNCIATION * enPR: mēt, IPA(key): /miːt/ * Rhymes: -iːt * Homophones: meat, mete VERB MEET (_third-person singular simple present_ MEETS, _present participle_ MEETING, _simple past and past participle_ MET) * (heading) _Of individuals: to make personal contact._ * ​To come face to face with by accident; to encounter. _Fancy MEETING you here!  Guess who I MET at the supermarket today?_ * To come face to face with someone by arrangement. _Let's MEET at the station at 9 o'clock.  Shall we MEET at 8 p.m in our favorite chatroom?_ * To be introduced to someone. _I'm pleased to MEET you!  I'd like you to MEET a colleague of mine._ _I MET my husband through a mutual friend at a party. It wasn't love at first sight; in fact, we couldn't stand each other at first!_ * 1915, Emerson Hough, _The Purchase Price_, chapterI: Captain Edward Carlisle […] felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, […]; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed the fate which had assigned such a duty, cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to MEET so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard. * (Ireland) To French kiss someone. * (heading) _Of groups: to gather or oppose._ * To gather for a formal or social discussion. _I MET with them several times.  The government ministers MET today to start the negotiations._ * 1893, Walter Besant, _The Ivory Gate_, chapterIII: At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors. […] In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who MET every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass. * To come together in conflict. * 1485, Thomas Malory, _Le Morte Darthur_, Book X, chapter lv: Sir said Epynegrys is þt the rule of yow arraunt knyghtes for to make a knyght to Iuste will he or nyll / As for that sayd Dynadan make the redy / for here is for me / And there with al they spored theyr horses & METT to gyders soo hard that Epynegrys smote doune sir Dynadan * John Milton (1608-1674) Weapons more violent, when next we MEET, / May serve to better us and worse our foes. * (sports) To play a match. _England and Holland will MEET in the final._ * (heading) _To make physical or perceptual contact._ * To converge and finally touch or intersect. _The two streets MEET at a crossroad half a mile away._ * 1915, Emerson Hough, _The Purchase Price_, chapterI: Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he MET her steady gaze, her alluring smile; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. * To touch or hit something while moving. _The right wing of the car MET the column in the garage, leaving a dent._ * To adjoin, be physically touching. The carpet MEETS the wall at this

From Middle English meten, from Old English mētan (to meet, find, find out, fall in with, encounter, obtain), from Proto-Germanic *mōtijaną (to meet), from Proto-Indo-European *mōd-, *mad- (to come, meet). Cognate with Scots met, mete, meit (to meet), North Frisian mete (to meet), West Frisian moetsje (to meet), Dutch ontmoeten (to meet), Low German, möten (to meet), Danish møde (to meet), Swedish möta (to meet), Icelandic mæta (to meet). Related to moot.

Pronunciation

Verb

meet (third-person singular simple present meets, present participle meeting, simple past and past participle met)

  1. (heading) Of individuals: to make personal contact.
    1. ​To come face to face with by accident; to encounter.
      Fancy meeting you here!  Guess who I met at the supermarket today?
    2. To come face to face with someone by arrangement.
      Let's meet at the station at 9 o'clock.  Shall we meet at 8 p.m in our favorite chatroom?
    3. To be introduced to someone.
      I'm pleased to meet you!  I'd like you to meet a colleague of mine.
      I met my husband through a mutual friend at a party. It wasn't love at first sight; in fact, we couldn't stand each other at first!
    4. (Ireland) To French kiss someone.
  2. (heading) Of groups: to gather or oppose.
    1. To gather for a formal or social discussion.
      I met with them several times.  The government ministers met today to start the negotiations.
    2. To come together in conflict.
    3. (sports) To play a match.
      England and Holland will meet in the final.
  3. (heading) To make physical or perceptual contact.
    1. To converge and finally touch or intersect.
      The two streets meet at a crossroad half a mile away.
    2. To touch or hit something while moving.
      The right wing of the car met the column in the garage, leaving a dent.
    3. To adjoin, be physically touching.
      The carpet meets the wall at this

English - Etymology 2

From Middle English _mete_, _imete_, from Old English _ġemǣte_ (“suitable, having the same measurements”), from the Proto-Germanic _*gamētijaz_ (cognate with Dutch _meten_ (“measure”), German _gemäß_ (“suitable”) etc.), itself from collective prefix _ge-_ + Proto-Indo-European _*med-_ (“to measure”). PRONUNCIATION * enPR: mēt, IPA(key): /miːt/ * Rhymes: -iːt * Homophones: meat, mete ADJECTIVE MEET (_comparative_ MEETER, _superlative_ MEETEST) * suitable; right; proper * For usage examples of this term, see the citations page. TRANSLATIONS

From Middle English mete, imete, from Old English ġemǣte (suitable, having the same measurements), from the Proto-Germanic *gamētijaz (cognate with Dutch meten (measure), German gemäß (suitable) etc.), itself from collective prefix ge- + Proto-Indo-European *med- (to measure).

Pronunciation

Adjective

meet (comparative meeter, superlative meetest)

  1. suitable; right; proper
Translations

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - REFERENCES
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English - References

* “meet” in Douglas Harper, _Online Etymology Dictionary_ (2001). [2]

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
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English - Anagrams

* mete * teem

Que a categoria em DUTCH - PRONUNCIATION
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Dutch - Pronunciation

* Rhymes: -eːt * IPA(key): /meːt/

  • Rhymes: -eːt
  • IPA(key): /meːt/

Que a categoria em DUTCH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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Dutch - Etymology 1

From English NOUN MEET f (_plural_ METEN, _diminutive_ MEETJE n) * The finish line in a competition

From English

Noun

meet f (plural meten, diminutive meetje n)

  1. The finish line in a competition

Que a categoria em DUTCH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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Dutch - Etymology 2

See _meten_. VERB MEET * first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of _meten_ * imperative of _meten_

See meten.

Verb

meet

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of meten
  2. imperative of meten

Que a categoria em DUTCH - ANAGRAMS
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Dutch - Anagrams

* mete

Que a categoria em LATIN - VERB
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Latin - Verb

MEET * third-person singular present active subjunctive of _meō_

meet

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of meō


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