Ajude o site a continuar crescendo, curta a nossa fan page.

press   
      

Tem 5 letras ( p r e s s )         1 vogais ( e )         4 consoantes ( p r s s )         Palavra ao contrário sserp

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Pronunciation

* (UK, US) IPA(key): /pɹɛs/ * Rhymes: -ɛs

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /pɹɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology 1

Middle English _presse_ (“throng, crowd, clothespress”), partially from Old English _press_ (“clothespress”), from Medieval Latin _pressa_, and partially from Old French _presse_ (Modern French _presse_) from Old French _presser_ (“to press”), from Latin _pressāre_ from _pressus_, past participle of _premere_ "to press". Displaced native Middle English _thring_ (“press, crowd, throng”) (from Old English _þring_ (“a press, crowd, anything that presses or confines”)). NOUN PRESS (_countable and uncountable_, _plural_ PRESSES) * (countable) A device used to apply pressure to an item. _a flower PRESS_ * (countable) A printing machine. _Stop the PRESSES!_ * (uncountable) A collective term for the print-based media (both the people and the newspapers). _according to a member of the PRESS;  This article appeared in the PRESS._ * (countable) A publisher. * (countable, chiefly in Ireland and Scotland) An enclosed storage space (e.g. closet, cupboard). _Put the cups in the PRESS.  Put the ironing in the linen PRESS._ * 1879, Richard Jefferies, _The Amateur Poacher_, chapter1: But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶ […] The linen-PRESS and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window at the old mare feeding in the meadow below by the brook, and a 'bead' could be drawn upon Molly, the dairymaid, kissing the fogger behind the hedge,

Middle English presse (throng, crowd, clothespress), partially from Old English press (clothespress), from Medieval Latin pressa, and partially from Old French presse (Modern French presse) from Old French presser (to press), from Latin pressāre from pressus, past participle of premere "to press". Displaced native Middle English thring (press, crowd, throng) (from Old English þring (a press, crowd, anything that presses or confines)).

Noun

press (countable and uncountable, plural presses)

  1. (countable) A device used to apply pressure to an item.
    a flower press
    1. (countable) A printing machine.
      Stop the presses!
  2. (uncountable) A collective term for the print-based media (both the people and the newspapers).
    according to a member of the press;  This article appeared in the press.
  3. (countable) A publisher.
  4. (countable, chiefly in Ireland and Scotland) An enclosed storage space (e.g. closet, cupboard).
    Put the cups in the press.  Put the ironing in the linen press.
Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology 2

Middle English _pressen_ (“to crowd, thring, press”), from Old French _presser_ (“to press”) (Modern French _presser_) from Latin _pressāre_ from _pressus_, past participle of _premere_ "to press". Displaced native Middle English _thringen_ (“to press, crowd, throng”) (from Old English _þringan_ (“to press, crowd”)), Middle English _thrasten_ (“to press, force, urge”) (from Old English _þrǣstan_ (“to press, force”)), Old English _þryscan_ (“to press”), Old English _þȳwan_ (“to press, impress”). VERB PRESS (_third-person singular simple present_ PRESSES, _present participle_ PRESSING, _simple past and past participle_ PRESSED _or_ PREST) * (transitive, intransitive) to exert weight or force against, to act upon with with force or weight * (transitive) to compress, squeeze _to press fruit for the purpose of extracting the juice_ * (transitive) to clasp, hold in an embrace; to hug _She took her son, and press'd_ _The illustrious infant to her fragrant breast_ (_Dryden_, Illiad, VI. 178.) * (transitive) to reduce to a particular shape or form by pressure, especially flatten or smooth _to press cloth with an iron_ _to press a hat_ * (transitive, sewing) To flatten a selected area of fabric using an iron with an up-and-down, not sliding, motion, so as to avoid disturbing adjacent areas. * (transitive) to drive or thrust by pressure, to force in a certain direction _to press a crowd back_ * (transitive, obsolete) to weigh upon, oppress, trouble _He turns from us;_ _Alas, he weeps too! Something presses him_ _He would reveal, but dare not.-Sir, be comforted._ (_Fletcher_, Pilgrim, I. 2.) * (transitive) to force to a certain end or result; to urge strongly, impel * 1726, Jonathan Swift, _Gulliver's Travels_, Part III, Chapter VIII The two gentlemen who conducted me to the island were PRESSED by their private affairs to return in three days. * To try to force (something upon someone); to urge or inculcate. _to PRESS the Bible on an audience_ * Dryden He PRESSED a letter upon me within this hour. * Addison Be sure to PRESS upon him every motive. * (transitive) to hasten, urge onward _to PRESS a horse in a race_ * (transitive) to urge, beseech, entreat _God heard their prayers, wherein they earnestly pressed him for the honor of his great name._ (_Winthrop_, Hist. New England, II. 35) * (transitive) to lay stress upon, emphasize _If we read but a very little, we naturally want to press it all; if we read a great deal, we are willing not to press the whole of what we read, and we learn what ought to be pressed and what not._ (_M. Arnold_, Literature and Dogma, Pref.) * (transitive, intransitive) to throng, crowd * (transitive, obsolete) to print * To force into service, particularly into naval service. * Dryden To peaceful peasant to the wars is PRESSED. QUOTATIONS * For usage examples of this term, see the citations page. SYNONYMS * thring * thrutch DERIVED TERMS * press charges * press on TRANSLATIONS

Middle English pressen (to crowd, thring, press), from Old French presser (to press) (Modern French presser) from Latin pressāre from pressus, past participle of premere "to press". Displaced native Middle English thringen (to press, crowd, throng) (from Old English þringan (to press, crowd)), Middle English thrasten (to press, force, urge) (from Old English þrǣstan (to press, force)), Old English þryscan (to press), Old English þȳwan (to press, impress).

Verb

press (third-person singular simple present presses, present participle pressing, simple past and past participle pressed or prest)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to exert weight or force against, to act upon with with force or weight
  2. (transitive) to compress, squeeze
    to press fruit for the purpose of extracting the juice
  3. (transitive) to clasp, hold in an embrace; to hug
    She took her son, and press'd
    The illustrious infant to her fragrant breast (Dryden, Illiad, VI. 178.)
  4. (transitive) to reduce to a particular shape or form by pressure, especially flatten or smooth
    to press cloth with an iron
    to press a hat
  5. (transitive, sewing) To flatten a selected area of fabric using an iron with an up-and-down, not sliding, motion, so as to avoid disturbing adjacent areas.
  6. (transitive) to drive or thrust by pressure, to force in a certain direction
    to press a crowd back
  7. (transitive, obsolete) to weigh upon, oppress, trouble
    He turns from us;
    Alas, he weeps too! Something presses him
    He would reveal, but dare not.-Sir, be comforted. (Fletcher, Pilgrim, I. 2.)
  8. (transitive) to force to a certain end or result; to urge strongly, impel
  9. To try to force (something upon someone); to urge or inculcate.
    to press the Bible on an audience
  10. (transitive) to hasten, urge onward
    to press a horse in a race
  11. (transitive) to urge, beseech, entreat
    God heard their prayers, wherein they earnestly pressed him for the honor of his great name. (Winthrop, Hist. New England, II. 35)
  12. (transitive) to lay stress upon, emphasize
    If we read but a very little, we naturally want to press it all; if we read a great deal, we are willing not to press the whole of what we read, and we learn what ought to be pressed and what not. (M. Arnold, Literature and Dogma, Pref.)
  13. (transitive, intransitive) to throng, crowd
  14. (transitive, obsolete) to print
  15. To force into service, particularly into naval service.
Quotations
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - SEE ALSO
Informações sobre o assunto

English - See Also

* hot press _(baking, laundry)_ * hot off the press _(printing)_ * press down

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - REFERENCES
Informações sobre o assunto

English - References

* Entry for the imperfect and past participle in Webster's dictionary * press in _The Century Dictionary_, The Century Co., New York, 1911 * “press” in _OED Online_, Oxford University Press, 1989.

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Anagrams

* RESPs

Que a categoria em GERMAN - VERB
Informações sobre o assunto

German - Verb

PRESS * Imperative singular of _pressen_. * (colloquial)First-person singular present of _pressen_.

press

  1. Imperative singular of pressen.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of pressen.

Que a categoria em SWEDISH - NOUN
Informações sobre o assunto

Swedish - Noun

PRESS

press


comments powered by Disqus

Facebook




[X]

Conhecer pessoas


Pratique o seu Inglês conhecendo pessoas do mundo todo

Encontrar