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Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
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English - Etymology

From Anglo-Norman _space_, variant of _espace_, _espas_ et al., and Old French _spaze_, variant of _espace_, from Latin _spatium_, from Proto-Indo-European ( > _speed_).

From Anglo-Norman space, variant of espace, espas et al., and Old French spaze, variant of espace, from Latin spatium, from Proto-Indo-European ( > speed).

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* enPR: spās, IPA(key): /speɪs/ * Rhymes: -eɪs

  • enPR: spās, IPA(key): /speɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - NOUN
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English - Noun

SPACE (_countable and uncountable_, _plural_ SPACES) * (heading) _Of time._ * (now rare, archaic) Free time; leisure, opportunity. [from 14thc.] * 1616, William Shakespeare, _All's Well that Ends Well_ Come on, thou are granted SPACE. * 1793, Henry Boyd, "The Royal Message", _Poems_ In two days hence / The judge of life and death ascends his seat. / —This will afford him SPACE to reach the camp […]. * A specific (specified) period of time. [from 14thc.] * 1893, Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman, _Giles Corey_ I pray you, sirs, to take some cheers the while I go for a moment's SPACE to my poor afflicted child. * 2007, Andy Bull, _The Guardian_, 20 October: The match was lost, though, in the SPACE of just twenty minutes or so. * An undefined period of time (without qualifier, especially a short period); a while. [from 15thc.] * 1923, PG Wodehouse, _The Inimitable Jeeves_ Even Comrade Butt cast off his gloom for a SPACE and immersed his whole being in scrambled eggs. * (heading) _Unlimited or generalized physical extent._ * Distance between things. [from 14thc.] * C.1607, William Shakespeare, _Antony and Cleopatra_: But neere him, thy Angell / Becomes a feare: as being o're-powr'd, therefore / Make SPACE enough betweene you. * 2001, Sam Wollaston, _The Guardian_, 3 November: Which means that for every car there was 10 years ago, there are now 40. Which means - and this is my own, not totally scientific, calculation - that the SPACE between cars on the roads in 1991 was roughly 39 car lengths, because today there is no SPACE at all. * Physical extent across two or three dimensions; area, volume (sometimes _for_ or _to do_ something). [from 14thc.] * 1601, William Shakespeare, _Hamlet_, First Folio 1623 O God, I could be bounded in a nutshell, and / count my selfe a King of infinite SPACE; were it not that / I haue bad dreames. * 2007, Dominic Bradbury, _The Guardian_, 12 May: They also wanted a larger garden and more SPACE for home working. * Physical extent in all directions, seen as an attribute of the universe (now usually considered as a part of space-time), or a mathematical model of this. [from 17thc.] * 1656, Thomas Hobbes, _Elements of Philosophy_, II SPACE is the Phantasme of a Thing existing without the Mind simply. * 1880, _Popular Science_, August: These are not questions which can be decided by reference to our SPACE intuitions, for our intuitions are confined to Euclidean SPACE, and even there are insufficient, approximative. * 2007, Anushka Asthana & David Smith, _The Observer_, 15 April: The early results from Gravity Probe B, one of Nasa's most complicated satellites, confirmed yesterday 'to a precision of better than 1 per cent' the assertion Einstein made 90 years ago - that an object such as the Earth does indeed distort the fabric of SPACE and time. * The near-vacuum in which planets, stars and other celestial objects are situated; the universe beyond the earth's atmosphere. [from 17thc.] * 1901, HG Wells, _The First Men in the Moon_: After all, to go into outer SPACE is not so much worse, if at all, than a polar expedition. * 2010, _The Guardian_, 9 August: The human race must colonise SPACE within the next two centuries or it will become extinct, Stephen Hawking warned today. * The physical and psychological area one needs within which to live or operate; personal freedom. [from 20thc.] * 1996, Linda Brodkey, _Writing Permitted in Designated Areas Only_: Around the time of my parents' divorce, I learned that reading could also

space (countable and uncountable, plural spaces)

  1. (heading) Of time.
    1. (now rare, archaic) Free time; leisure, opportunity. [from 14thc.]
    2. A specific (specified) period of time. [from 14thc.]
    3. An undefined period of time (without qualifier, especially a short period); a while. [from 15thc.]
  2. (heading) Unlimited or generalized physical extent.
    1. Distance between things. [from 14thc.]
    2. Physical extent across two or three dimensions; area, volume (sometimes for or to do something). [from 14thc.]
    3. Physical extent in all directions, seen as an attribute of the universe (now usually considered as a part of space-time), or a mathematical model of this. [from 17thc.]
    4. The near-vacuum in which planets, stars and other celestial objects are situated; the universe beyond the earth's atmosphere. [from 17thc.]
    5. The physical and psychological area one needs within which to live or operate; personal freedom. [from 20thc.]

English - Verb

SPACE (_third-person singular simple present_ SPACES, _present participle_ SPACING, _simple past and past participle_ SPACED) * (obsolete, intransitive) To roam, walk, wander. * 1596, Edmund Spenser, _The Faerie Queene_, IV.ii: But she as Fayes are wont, in priuie place / Did spend her dayes, and lov'd in forests wyld to SPACE. * (transitive) To set some distance apart. _Faye had SPACED the pots at 8-inch intervals on the windowsill._ _The cities are evenly SPACED._ * To insert or utilise spaces in a written text. _This paragraph seems badly SPACED._ * (transitive) To eject into outer space, usually without a space suit. _The captain SPACED the traitors._ DERIVED TERMS * spaced * spaced-out TRANSLATIONS

space (third-person singular simple present spaces, present participle spacing, simple past and past participle spaced)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To roam, walk, wander.
  2. (transitive) To set some distance apart.
    Faye had spaced the pots at 8-inch intervals on the windowsill.
    The cities are evenly spaced.
  3. To insert or utilise spaces in a written text.
    This paragraph seems badly spaced.
  4. (transitive) To eject into outer space, usually without a space suit.
    The captain spaced the traitors.

Derived terms

Translations

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - RELATED TERMS
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English - Related Terms

* espace * spacious * spatial

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
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English - Anagrams

* capes, paces, scape

Que a categoria em OLD FRENCH - NOUN
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Old French - Noun

SPACE m (_oblique plural_ SPACES, _nominative singular_ SPACES, _nominative plural_ SPACE) * alternative form of _espace_

space m (oblique plural spaces, nominative singular spaces, nominative plural space)

  1. alternative form of espace


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