Ajude o site a continuar crescendo, curta a nossa fan page.

theory   
      

Tem 6 letras ( t h e o r y )         2 vogais ( e o )         4 consoantes ( t h r y )         Palavra ao contrário yroeht

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology

From Middle French _théorie_, from Late Latin _theōria_, from Ancient Greek _θεωρία_ (theōría, “contemplation, speculation, a looking at, things looked at”), from _θεωρέω_ (theōréō, “I look at, view, consider, examine”), from _θεωρός_ (theōrós, “spectator”), from _θέα_ (théa, “a view”) + _ὁράω_ (horáō, “I see,look”).

From Middle French théorie, from Late Latin theōria, from Ancient Greek θεωρία (theōría, contemplation, speculation, a looking at, things looked at), from θεωρέω (theōréō, I look at, view, consider, examine), from θεωρός (theōrós, spectator), from θέα (théa, a view) + ὁράω (horáō, I see,look).

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Pronunciation

* (UK) IPA(key): /ˈθɪəɹi/ * Rhymes: -ɪəri

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈθɪəɹi/
  • Rhymes: -ɪəri

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - NOUN
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Noun

THEORY (_countable and uncountable_, _plural_ THEORIES) * (obsolete) Mental conception; reflection, consideration. [16th-18th c.] * 1646, Thomas Browne, _Pseudodoxia Epidemica_, VII.19: As they encrease the hatred of vice in some, so doe they enlarge the THEORY of wickednesse in all. * (sciences) A coherent statement or set of ideas that explains observed facts or phenomena, or which sets out the laws and principles of something known or observed; a hypothesis confirmed by observation, experiment etc. [from 17th c.] * 2002, Duncan Steel, _The Guardian_, 23 May 2002: It was only when Einstein's THEORY of relativity was published in 1915 that physicists could show that Mercury's "anomaly" was actually because Newton's gravitational THEORY was incomplete. * 2003, Bill Bryson, _A Short History of Nearly Everything_, BCA, p. 118: The world would need additional decades [...] before the Big Bang would begin to move from interesting idea to established THEORY. * 2009, Richard Dawkins, _The Greatest Show On Earth: The Evidence for Evolution_, Bantam, p. 10: Scientists and creationists are understanding the word "THEORY" in two very different senses. Evolution is a THEORY in the same sense as the heliocentric THEORY. In neither case should the word "only" be used, as in "only a THEORY". * (uncountable) The underlying principles or methods of a given technical skill, art etc., as opposed to its practice. [from 17th c.] * 1990, Tony Bennett, _Outside Literature_, p. 139: Does this mean, then, that there can be no such thing as a THEORY of literature? * 1998, Elizabeth Souritz, _The Great History of Russian Ballet_: Lopukhov wrote a number of books and articles on ballet THEORY, as well as his memoirs. * (mathematics) A field of study attempting to exhaustively describe a particular class of constructs. [from 18th c.] _Knot THEORY classifies the mappings of a circle into 3-space._ * A hypothesis or conjecture. [from 18th c.] * 1999, Wes DeMott, _Vapors_: It's just a THEORY I have, and I wonder if women would agree. But don't men say a lot about themselves when a short-skirted woman slides out of a car or chair? * 2003, Sean Coughlan, _The Guardian_, 21 Jun 2003: The THEORY is that by stripping costs to the bone, they are able to offer ludicrously low fares. * (countable, logic) A set of axioms together with all statements derivable from them. _Equivalently,_ a formal language plus a set of axioms (from which can then be derived theorems). _A THEORY is consistent if it has a model._ USAGE NOTES In scientific discourse, the sense “unproven conjecture” is discouraged (with _hypothesis_ or _conjecture_ preferred), due to unintentional ambiguity and intentional equivocation with the sense “well-developed statement or structure”. SYNONYMS * See also Wikisaurus:supposition HOLONYMS * (in logic): formal system MERONYMS * (in logic): axioms DERIVED TERMS RELATED TERMS * theorem * theoretical * theorise, theorize TRANSLATIONS

theory (countable and uncountable, plural theories)

  1. (obsolete) Mental conception; reflection, consideration. [16th-18th c.]
  2. (sciences) A coherent statement or set of ideas that explains observed facts or phenomena, or which sets out the laws and principles of something known or observed; a hypothesis confirmed by observation, experiment etc. [from 17th c.]
  3. (uncountable) The underlying principles or methods of a given technical skill, art etc., as opposed to its practice. [from 17th c.]
  4. (mathematics) A field of study attempting to exhaustively describe a particular class of constructs. [from 18th c.]
    Knot theory classifies the mappings of a circle into 3-space.
  5. A hypothesis or conjecture. [from 18th c.]
  6. (countable, logic) A set of axioms together with all statements derivable from them. Equivalently, a formal language plus a set of axioms (from which can then be derived theorems).
    A theory is consistent if it has a model.

Usage notes

In scientific discourse, the sense “unproven conjecture” is discouraged (with hypothesis or conjecture preferred), due to unintentional ambiguity and intentional equivocation with the sense “well-developed statement or structure”.

Synonyms

Holonyms

Meronyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - SEE ALSO
Informações sobre o assunto

English - See Also

* axiom * postulate * proposition


comments powered by Disqus

Facebook




[X]

Conhecer pessoas


Pratique o seu Inglês conhecendo pessoas do mundo todo

Encontrar