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Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

From Middle English, from Old French _train_ (“a delay, a drawing out”), from _traïner_ (“to pull out, to draw”), from Vulgar Latin _*tragināre_, from _*tragere_, from Latin _trahere_ (“to pull, to draw”). The verb was derived from the noun in Middle English. PRONUNCIATION * IPA(key): /tɹeɪn/, [tʃɹeɪn] * Rhymes: -eɪn NOUN TRAIN (_plural_ TRAINS) * Elongated portion. * The elongated back portion of a dress or skirt (or an ornamental piece of material added to similar effect), which drags along the ground. [from 14th c.] _Unfortunately, the leading bridesmaid stepped on the bride's TRAIN as they were walking down the aisle._ * 1817, Jane Austen, _Northanger Abbey_: They called each other by their Christian name, were always arm in arm when they walked, pinned up each other's TRAIN for the dance, and were not to be divided in the set [...]. * 2011, Imogen Fox, _The Guardian_, 20 Apr 2011: Lace sleeves, a demure neckline, a full skirt and a relatively modest TRAIN. * A trail or line _of_ something, especially gunpowder. [from 15th c.] * 1873, Charlotte Mary Yonge, _Aunt Charlotte's Stories of English History for the little ones_: A party was sent to search, and there they found all the powder ready prepared, and, moreover, a man with a lantern, one Guy Fawkes, who had undertaken to be the one to set fire to the TRAIN of gunpowder, hoping to escape before the explosion. * (now rare) An animal's trail or track. [from 16th c.] * Connected sequence of people or things. * A group of people following an important figure, king etc.; a retinue, a group of retainers. [from 14th c.] * 1610, _The Tempest_, by Shakespeare, act 5 scene 1 Sir, I invite your Highness and your TRAIN / To my poor cell, where you shall take your rest /For this one night * 2009, Anne Easter Smith, _The King's Grace_: Grace was glad the citizenry did not know Katherine Gordon was in the king's TRAIN, but she was beginning to understand Henry's motive for including the pretender's wife. * A group of animals, vehicles, or people that follow one another in a line, such as a wagon train; a caravan or procession. [from 15th c.] _Our party formed a TRAIN at the funeral parlor before departing for the burial._ * A sequence of events or ideas which are interconnected; a course or procedure _of_ something. [from 15th c.] * 1872, Charles Darwin, _The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals_: A man may be absorbed in the deepest thought, and his brow will remain smooth until he encounters some obstacle in his TRAIN of reasoning, or is interrupted by some disturbance, and then a frown passes like a shadow over his brow. * 2012, Rory Carroll, _The Guardian_, 18 Jun 2012: "Where was I?" he asked several times during the lunch, losing his TRAIN of thought. * (military) The men and vehicles following an army, which carry artillery and other equipment for battle or siege. [from 16th c.] * A set of interconnected mechanical parts which operate each other in sequence. [from 18th c.] * A series of electrical pulses. [from 19th c.] * A series _of_ specified vehicles, originally tramcars in a mine, and later especially railway carriages, coupled together. [from 19th c.] * A line of connected railway cars or carriages considered overall as a mode of transport; (as uncountable noun) rail travel. [from 19th c.] _The TRAIN will pull in at midday._ * 2009, Hanif Kureishi, _The Guardian_, 24 Jan 2009: This winter we thought we'd go to Venice by TRAIN, for the adventure. * A long, heavy sleigh used in Canada for the transportation of

From Middle English, from Old French train (a delay, a drawing out), from traïner (to pull out, to draw), from Vulgar Latin *tragināre, from *tragere, from Latin trahere (to pull, to draw). The verb was derived from the noun in Middle English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɹeɪn/, [tʃɹeɪn]
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Noun

train (plural trains)

  1. Elongated portion.
    1. The elongated back portion of a dress or skirt (or an ornamental piece of material added to similar effect), which drags along the ground. [from 14th c.]
      Unfortunately, the leading bridesmaid stepped on the bride's train as they were walking down the aisle.
    2. A trail or line of something, especially gunpowder. [from 15th c.]
    3. (now rare) An animal's trail or track. [from 16th c.]
  2. Connected sequence of people or things.
    1. A group of people following an important figure, king etc.; a retinue, a group of retainers. [from 14th c.]
    2. A group of animals, vehicles, or people that follow one another in a line, such as a wagon train; a caravan or procession. [from 15th c.]
      Our party formed a train at the funeral parlor before departing for the burial.
    3. A sequence of events or ideas which are interconnected; a course or procedure of something. [from 15th c.]
    4. (military) The men and vehicles following an army, which carry artillery and other equipment for battle or siege. [from 16th c.]
    5. A set of interconnected mechanical parts which operate each other in sequence. [from 18th c.]
    6. A series of electrical pulses. [from 19th c.]
    7. A series of specified vehicles, originally tramcars in a mine, and later especially railway carriages, coupled together. [from 19th c.]
    8. A line of connected railway cars or carriages considered overall as a mode of transport; (as uncountable noun) rail travel. [from 19th c.]
      The train will pull in at midday.
    9. A long, heavy sleigh used in Canada for the transportation of
      Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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English - Etymology 2

From Anglo-Norman _traine_, Middle French _traïne_, from _traïr_ (“to betray”). NOUN TRAIN (_plural_ TRAINS) * (obsolete) Treachery; deceit. [14th-19th c.] * 1590, Edmund Spenser, _The Faerie Queene_, III.3: In the meane time, through that false Ladies TRAINE / He was surprisd, and buried under beare, / Ne ever to his worke returnd againe [...]. * (obsolete) A trick or stratagem. [14th-19th c.] * (obsolete) A trap for animals; a snare. [14th-18th c.] * (obsolete) A lure; a decoy. [15th-18th c.]

From Anglo-Norman traine, Middle French traïne, from traïr (to betray).

Noun

train (plural trains)

  1. (obsolete) Treachery; deceit. [14th-19th c.]
  2. (obsolete) A trick or stratagem. [14th-19th c.]
  3. (obsolete) A trap for animals; a snare. [14th-18th c.]
  4. (obsolete) A lure; a decoy. [15th-18th c.]

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
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English - Anagrams

* Trina

Que a categoria em DUTCH - VERB
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Dutch - Verb

TRAIN * first-person singular present indicative of _trainen_ * imperative of _trainen_

train

  1. first-person singular present indicative of trainen
  2. imperative of trainen

Que a categoria em DUTCH - ANAGRAMS
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Dutch - Anagrams

* tiran

Que a categoria em FRENCH - ETYMOLOGY
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French - Etymology

From _trainer_, from Vulgar Latin _*traginare_.

From trainer, from Vulgar Latin *traginare.

Que a categoria em FRENCH - PRONUNCIATION
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French - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /tʁɛ̃/

  • IPA(key): /tʁɛ̃/

Que a categoria em FRENCH - NOUN
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French - Noun

TRAIN m (_plural_ TRAINS) * train (rail mounted vehicle) * pace DERIVED TERMS * en train de * train de vie

train m (plural trains)

  1. train (rail mounted vehicle)
  2. pace

Derived terms

Que a categoria em FRENCH - ANAGRAMS
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French - Anagrams

* riant

Que a categoria em FRENCH - EXTERNAL LINKS
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French - External Links

* “train” in _le Trésor de la langue française informatisé_ (_The Digitized Treasury of the French Language_).

Que a categoria em JÈRRIAIS - ETYMOLOGY
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Jèrriais - Etymology

From Old French _train_ (“a delay, a drawing out”), from _trainer_ (“to pull out, to draw”), from Vulgar Latin _*tragināre_, from _*tragere_, from Latin _trahō, trahere_ (“pull, draw”).

From Old French train (a delay, a drawing out), from trainer (to pull out, to draw), from Vulgar Latin *tragināre, from *tragere, from Latin trahō, trahere (pull, draw).

Que a categoria em JÈRRIAIS - NOUN
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Jèrriais - Noun

TRAIN m (_plural_ TRAINS) * train

train m (plural trains)

  1. train


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