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Tem 4 letras ( w i l l )         1 vogais ( i )         3 consoantes ( w l l )         Palavra ao contrário lliw

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
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English - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /wɪl/, [wɪɫ] * Rhymes: -ɪl

  • IPA(key): /wɪl/, [wɪɫ]
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _wille_, from Old English _willa_ (“mind, will, determination, purpose, desire, wish, request, joy, delight, pleasure”) (compare verb _willian_), from Proto-Germanic _*wiljô_ (“desire, will”), from Proto-Indo-European _*wel-_ (“to choose, wish”). Cognate with Dutch _wil_, German _Wille_, Swedish _vilja_. The verb is not always distinguishable from Etymology 2, below. NOUN WILL (_plural_ WILLS) * (archaic) Desire, longing. (Now generally merged with later senses.) [from 9th c.] _He felt a great WILL to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land._ * One's independent faculty of choice; the ability to be able to exercise one's choice or intention. [from 9th c.] _Of course, man's WILL is often regulated by his reason._ * One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands. [from 9th c.] _Eventually I submitted to my parents' WILL._ * (archaic) That which is desired; one's wish. [from 10th c.] * 1590, Edmund Spenser, _The Faerie Queene_, III.ii: I auow by this most sacred head / Of my deare foster child, to ease thy griefe, / And win thy WILL [...]. * The act of choosing to do something; a person’s conscious intent or volition. [from 10th c.] _Most creatures have a WILL to live._ * A formal declaration of one's intent concerning the disposal of one's property and holdings after death; the legal document stating such wishes. [from 14th c.] USAGE NOTES * Can be said to be strong, free, independent, etc. DERIVED TERMS * at will * wilful, willful * willpower * with a will TRANSLATIONS VERB WILL (_third-person singular simple present_ WILLS, _present participle_ WILLING, _simple past_ WILLED _or_ (rare) WOULD, _past participle_ WILLED) * (archaic) To wish, desire. [9th–19th c.] * Bible, Matthew viii. 2 And behold, there came a leper and worshipped him, saying, Lord if thou WILT, thou canst make me clean. * (transitive, intransitive) To instruct (that something be done) in one's will. [from 9th c.] * (transitive) To try to make (something) happen by using one's will (intention). [from 10th c.] _All the fans were willing their team to win the game._ * Shakespeare They WILLED me say so, madam. * Beaumont and Fletcher Send for music, / And WILL the cooks to use their best of cunning / To please the palate. * (transitive) To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document). [from 15th c.] _He willed his stamp collection to the local museum._ SYNONYMS * (bequeath): bequeath, leave TRANSLATIONS SEE ALSO * bequeath * going to * modal verb * testament * volition * voluntary

From Middle English wille, from Old English willa (mind, will, determination, purpose, desire, wish, request, joy, delight, pleasure) (compare verb willian), from Proto-Germanic *wiljô (desire, will), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to choose, wish). Cognate with Dutch wil, German Wille, Swedish vilja. The verb is not always distinguishable from Etymology 2, below.

Noun

will (plural wills)

  1. (archaic) Desire, longing. (Now generally merged with later senses.) [from 9th c.]
    He felt a great will to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.
  2. One's independent faculty of choice; the ability to be able to exercise one's choice or intention. [from 9th c.]
    Of course, man's will is often regulated by his reason.
  3. One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands. [from 9th c.]
    Eventually I submitted to my parents' will.
  4. (archaic) That which is desired; one's wish. [from 10th c.]
  5. The act of choosing to do something; a person’s conscious intent or volition. [from 10th c.]
    Most creatures have a will to live.
  6. A formal declaration of one's intent concerning the disposal of one's property and holdings after death; the legal document stating such wishes. [from 14th c.]
Usage notes
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

will (third-person singular simple present wills, present participle willing, simple past willed or (rare) would, past participle willed)

  1. (archaic) To wish, desire. [9th–19th c.]
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To instruct (that something be done) in one's will. [from 9th c.]
  3. (transitive) To try to make (something) happen by using one's will (intention). [from 10th c.]
    All the fans were willing their team to win the game.
  4. (transitive) To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document). [from 15th c.]
    He willed his stamp collection to the local museum.
Synonyms
Translations

See also

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
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English - Etymology 2

From Middle English _willen_, _wullen_, _wollen_, from Old English _willan_, _wyllan_ (“to will, be willing, wish, desire, be used to, to be about to”), from Proto-Germanic _*wiljaną_ (“to desire, wish”), from Proto-Indo-European _*wel(h₁)-_ (“to choose, wish”). Cognate with Dutch _willen_, Low German _willen_, German _wollen_, Swedish _vilja_, Latin _velle_ (“wish”, _verb_) and Albanian _vel_ (“to satisfy, be stuffed”) .It is not always distinguishable from Etymology 1, above. VERB - (_third-person singular simple present_ WILL, _present participle_ WILLING, _simple past_ WOULD, _past participle_ -) * (rare, transitive) To wish, desire (something). [9th-18th c.] * 1944, FJ Sheed, translating St. Augustine, _Confessions_: Grant what Thou dost command, and command what Thou WILT. * (rare, intransitive) To wish or desire (that something happen); to intend (that). [9th-19th c.] * 1526, William Tyndale, trans. _Bible_, Matthew XXVI: the disciples cam to Jesus sayinge unto hym: where WYLT thou that we prepare for the to eate the ester lambe? * 1621, Robert Burton, _The Anatomy of Melancholy_: see God's goodwill toward men, hear how generally his grace is proposed, to him, and him, and them, each man in particular, and to all. 1 Tim. ii. 4. "God WILL that all men be saved, and come to the knowledge of the truth." * (auxiliary) To habitually do (a given action). [from 9th c.] * 1994, Nelson Mandela, _Long Walk to Freedom_, Abacus 2010, p. 28: As young men WILL, I did my best to appear suave and sophisticated. * 2009, Stephen Bayley, _The Telegraph_, 24 Sep 09: How telling is it that many women WILL volunteer for temporary disablement by wearing high heeled shoes that hobble them? * 2011, "Connubial bliss in America", _The Economist_: So far neither side has scored a decisive victory, though each WILL occasionally claim one. * (auxiliary) To choose to (do something), used to express intention but without any temporal connotations (+ bare infinitive). [from 10th c.] * (auxiliary) Used to express the future tense, formerly with some implication of volition when used in first person. Compare _shall_. [from 10th c.] * (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare, _Twelfth Night Or What You Will_, act IV: Good fool, as ever thou wilt deserve well at my hand, help me to a candle, and pen, ink and paper

From Middle English willen, wullen, wollen, from Old English willan, wyllan (to will, be willing, wish, desire, be used to, to be about to), from Proto-Germanic *wiljaną (to desire, wish), from Proto-Indo-European *wel(h₁)- (to choose, wish). Cognate with Dutch willen, Low German willen, German wollen, Swedish vilja, Latin velle (wish, verb) and Albanian vel (to satisfy, be stuffed) .It is not always distinguishable from Etymology 1, above.

Verb

- (third-person singular simple present will, present participle willing, simple past would, past participle -)

  1. (rare, transitive) To wish, desire (something). [9th-18th c.]
  2. (rare, intransitive) To wish or desire (that something happen); to intend (that). [9th-19th c.]
  3. (auxiliary) To habitually do (a given action). [from 9th c.]
  4. (auxiliary) To choose to (do something), used to express intention but without any temporal connotations (+ bare infinitive). [from 10th c.]
  5. (auxiliary) Used to express the future tense, formerly with some implication of volition when used in first person. Compare shall. [from 10th c.]
Que a categoria em CAHUILLA - NOUN
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Cahuilla - Noun

WÍLL * fat, grease

wíll

  1. fat, grease

Que a categoria em GERMAN - PRONUNCIATION
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German - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /vɪl/

  • IPA(key): /vɪl/

Que a categoria em GERMAN - VERB
Informações sobre o assunto

German - Verb

WILL * First-person singular present of _wollen_. * Third-person singular present of _wollen_.

will

  1. First-person singular present of wollen.
  2. Third-person singular present of wollen.


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