Ajude o site a continuar crescendo, curta a nossa fan page.

word   
      

Tem 4 letras ( w o r d )         1 vogais ( o )         3 consoantes ( w r d )         Palavra ao contrário drow

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Pronunciation

* (UK) IPA(key): /wɜː(ɹ)d/ * (US) enPR: wûrd, IPA(key): /wɝd/ * Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)d * Homophone: whirred (accents with the wine-whine merger)

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Etymology 1

From Middle English _word_, from Old English _word_ (“word, speech, sentence, statement, command, order, subject of talk, story, news, report, fame, promise, verb”), from Proto-Germanic _*wurdą_ (“word”), from Proto-Indo-European _*werdʰo-_ (“word”). Cognate with Scots _wourd_, _wird_ (“word”), West Frisian _wurd_ (“word”), Dutch _woord_ (“word”), German _Wort_ (“word”), Danish, Norwegian and Swedish _ord_ (“word”), Icelandic _orð_ (“word”), Latin _verbum_ (“word”), Lithuanian _vardas_ (“name”), Albanian _urtë_ (“sage, wise, silent”). Doublet of _verb_. NOUN WORD (_plural_ WORDS) * The smallest unit of language which has a particular meaning and can be expressed by itself; the smallest discrete, meaningful unit of language. (Contrast _morpheme_.) [from 10th c.] * 1986, David Barrat, _Media Sociology_ (ISBN 041505110X), page 112: The WORD, whether written or spoken, does not look like or sound like its meaning — it does not resemble its signified. We only connect the two because we have learnt the code — language. Without such knowledge, 'Maggie' would just be a meaningless pattern of shapes or sounds. * 2009, Jack Fitzgerald, _Viva La Evolucin_ (ISBN 055719833X), page 233: Brian and Abby signed the WORD _clothing_, in which the thumbs brush down the chest as though something is hanging there. They both spoke the WORD _clothing_. Brian then signed the WORD for _change_, […] * The smallest discrete unit of spoken language which has a particular meaning, composed of one or more phonemes and one or more morphemes. * 1894, Alex. R. Mackwen, _The Samaritan Passover_, in _Littell's Living Age_, series 6, volume 1: Then all was silent save the voice of the high priest, whose WORDS grew louder and louder, […] * The smallest discrete unit of written language which has a particular meaning, composed of one or more letters or symbols and one or more morphemes. * 1594, William Shakespeare, _The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark_, act 2, scene 2: Polonius: What do you read, my lord? Hamlet: WORDS, WORDS, WORDS. * 2003, Jan Furman, _Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon: A Casebook_ (ISBN 0195146352), page 194: The name was a confused gift of love from her father, who could not read the WORD but picked it out of the Bible for its visual shape, […] * 2009, Stanislas Dehaene, _Reading in the Brain: The New Science of How We Read_ (ISBN 1101152400): Well-meaning academics even introduced spelling absurdities such as the “s” in the WORD “island,” a misguided Renaissance attempt to restore the etymology of the [unrelated] Latin word _insula_. * A discrete, meaningful unit of language which is approved by some authority. * 1896, Israel Zangwill, _Without Prejudice_, page 21: “Ain’t! How often am I to tell you ain’t ain’t a WORD?” * 1999, Linda Greenlaw, _The Hungry Ocean_, Hyperion, page 11: _Fisherwoman_ isn’t even a WORD. It’s not in the dictionary. * A sequence of letters or characters, or sounds, which (does not necessarily belong to a language or have a meaning, but which) is considered as a discrete entity. * 1974, _Thinking Goes to School: Piaget's Theory in Practice_ (ISBN 0199839077), page 183: In still another variation, the nonsense WORD is presented and the teacher asks, "What sound was in the beginning of the word?" "In the middle?" and so on. The child should always respond with the phoneme; he should not use letter labels. * 2003, _How To Do Everything with Your Tablet PC_ (ISBN 0072227710), page 278: I wrote a nonsense WORD, "umbalooie," in the Input Panel's Writing Pad. Input Panel converted it to "cembalos" and displayed it in the Text Preview pane. * 2006, _Scribal Habits and Theological Influences in the Apocalypse_ (ISBN 3161491122), page 141: Here the scribe has dropped the με from καθημενος, thereby creating the nonsense word καθηνος. * 2013, The Cognitive Neuropsychology

From Middle English word, from Old English word (word, speech, sentence, statement, command, order, subject of talk, story, news, report, fame, promise, verb), from Proto-Germanic *wurdą (word), from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word). Cognate with Scots wourd, wird (word), West Frisian wurd (word), Dutch woord (word), German Wort (word), Danish, Norwegian and Swedish ord (word), Icelandic orð (word), Latin verbum (word), Lithuanian vardas (name), Albanian urtë (sage, wise, silent). Doublet of verb.

Noun

word (plural words)

  1. The smallest unit of language which has a particular meaning and can be expressed by itself; the smallest discrete, meaningful unit of language. (Contrast morpheme.) [from 10th c.]
    1. The smallest discrete unit of spoken language which has a particular meaning, composed of one or more phonemes and one or more morphemes.
    2. The smallest discrete unit of written language which has a particular meaning, composed of one or more letters or symbols and one or more morphemes.
    3. A discrete, meaningful unit of language which is approved by some authority.
    4. A sequence of letters or characters, or sounds, which (does not necessarily belong to a language or have a meaning, but which) is considered as a discrete entity.

English - Etymology 2

Variant of _worth_ (“to become, turn into, grow, get”), from Middle English _worthen_, from Old English _weorþan_ (“to turn into, become, grow”), from Proto-Germanic _*werþaną_ (“to turn, turn into, become”). More at worth. VERB WORD * alternative form of _worth_ (to become).

Variant of worth (to become, turn into, grow, get), from Middle English worthen, from Old English weorþan (to turn into, become, grow), from Proto-Germanic *werþaną (to turn, turn into, become). More at worth.

Verb

word

  1. alternative form of worth (to become).

Que a categoria em ENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
Informações sobre o assunto

English - Anagrams

* drow

Que a categoria em AFRIKAANS - ETYMOLOGY
Informações sobre o assunto

Afrikaans - Etymology

From Dutch _worden_.

From Dutch worden.

Que a categoria em AFRIKAANS - VERB
Informações sobre o assunto

Afrikaans - Verb

WORD (_present_ WORD, _present participle_ WORDENDE, _past participle_ GEWORD) * Indicates that something is in a changing state _Ek het ryk GEWORD._ I BECAME rich. _Ek WORD ryk._ I AM BECOMING rich. _Sy WORD beter._ She IS GETTING better. * Forms the present passive voice when followed by a past participle _Die kat WORD gevoer._ The cat IS BEING fed.

word (present word, present participle wordende, past participle geword)

  1. Indicates that something is in a changing state
    Ek het ryk geword.
    I became rich.
    Ek word ryk.
    I am becoming rich.
    Sy word beter.
    She is getting better.
  2. Forms the present passive voice when followed by a past participle
    Die kat word gevoer.
    The cat is being fed.

Que a categoria em DUTCH - PRONUNCIATION
Informações sobre o assunto

Dutch - Pronunciation

* Rhymes: -ɔrt

  • Rhymes: -ɔrt

Que a categoria em DUTCH - VERB
Informações sobre o assunto

Dutch - Verb

WORD * first-person singular present indicative of _worden_ * imperative of _worden_

word

  1. first-person singular present indicative of worden
  2. imperative of worden

Que a categoria em OLD ENGLISH - ALTERNATIVE FORMS
Informações sobre o assunto

Old English - Alternative Forms

* ƿord

Que a categoria em OLD ENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY
Informações sobre o assunto

Old English - Etymology

From Proto-Germanic _*wurdą_, from Proto-Indo-European _*werdʰo-_ (“word”), from Proto-Indo-European _*wer-_ (“speak”); cognate with Old Frisian _word_, Old Saxon _word_, Old Dutch _wort_ (Dutch _woord_), Old High German _wort_ (German _Wort_), Old Norse _orð_ (Icelandic _orð_, Swedish _ord_), Gothic

From Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word), from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (speak); cognate with Old Frisian word, Old Saxon word, Old Dutch wort (Dutch woord), Old High German wort (German Wort), Old Norse orð (Icelandic orð, Swedish ord), Gothic

Que a categoria em OLD ENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
Informações sobre o assunto

Old English - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /word/

  • IPA(key): /word/

Que a categoria em OLD ENGLISH - NOUN
Informações sobre o assunto

Old English - Noun

WORD n (_nominative plural_ WORD) * word * speech, utterance, statement * (grammar) verb * news, information, rumour * command, request DECLENSION

word n (nominative plural word)

  1. word
  2. speech, utterance, statement
  3. (grammar) verb
  4. news, information, rumour
  5. command, request

Declension

Que a categoria em OLD SAXON - ETYMOLOGY
Informações sobre o assunto

Old Saxon - Etymology

From Proto-Germanic _*wurdą_, from Proto-Indo-European _*werdʰo-_ (“word”). Compare Old English and Old Frisian _word_, Old High German _wort_, Old Norse _orð_.

From Proto-Germanic *wurdą, from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo- (word). Compare Old English and Old Frisian word, Old High German wort, Old Norse orð.

Que a categoria em OLD SAXON - PRONUNCIATION
Informações sobre o assunto

Old Saxon - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /word/

  • IPA(key): /word/

Que a categoria em OLD SAXON - NOUN
Informações sobre o assunto

Old Saxon - Noun

WORD n * word DECLENSION

word n

  1. word

Declension


comments powered by Disqus



[X]

Conhecer pessoas


Pratique o seu Inglês conhecendo pessoas do mundo todo

Encontrar