Помогите сайт, чтобы продолжить расти, как наш фан-страницу.

mask   
      

Она имеет 4 буквы ( m a s k )         1 гласные ( a )         3 согласные ( m s k )         Слово наоборот ksam

Какие в категорииENGLISH - PRONUNCIATION
Информация о предмете

English - Pronunciation

* (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /mɑːsk/ * (US) IPA(key): /mæsk/ * Rhymes: -æsk, -ɑːsk

Какие в категорииENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
Информация о предмете

English - Etymology 1

From Middle French _masque_ (“a covering to hide or protect the face”), from Italian _maschera_ (“mask, disguise”), from Medieval Latin _masca_, _mascha_, _mascus_ (“mask, nightmare, ghost”), of uncertain origin. Replaced Old English _grīma_ (“mask”). Medieval Latin _masca_, _mascha_, _mascus_ may represent the merger of two or more words: 1). a Germanic word from Old Frankish _*maska_, _*maskra_ ("mask, mesh"; compare Old English _mæscre_ (“mesh; discoloration, spot”), Old English _masc_ (“net, mesh netting”), Old High German _māsca_ (“mesh, ties”)), from Proto-Germanic _*maskwǭ_ (“mesh, mask”), from Proto-Indo-European _*mezgʷ-_ (“to knit, twist”), from the practice of wearing mesh netting over the face as a mask to filter air, keeping soot and dust particles from entering the lungs (compare _surgical mask_, _gas mask_, etc.); 2). Old French _mascurer_ ("to blacken (the face)"; compare Occitan _mascarar_, Catalan _mascarar_), from a stem _*maska_, _*mask-_ (“black”) believed to be of Pre-Indo-European origin giving rise to words meaning "witch, wizard, sorcerer" (compare Old Provençal _masco_ (“witch”), Occitan _masca_ (“witch”), French _masque_ (“brothel-keeper, witch”)); and perhaps another 3). from Arabic _مسخرة_ (maskhara(t), “buffoon, fool, pleasantry, anything ridiculous”), from _سخرة_ (sakhira, “to ridicule, to laugh at”). * Derived from the _-r-_ form: Italian _maschera_, Spanish and Portuguese _máscara_, Dutch _masker_, English _masquerade_. * Derived from the form lacking _-r-_: German _Maske_ and Swedish _mask_. ALTERNATIVE FORMS * masque (archaic, noun, verb) NOUN MASK (_plural_ MASKS) * A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection. _a dancer's MASK; a fencer's MASK; a ball player's MASK_ * That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge. * A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?) * (Can we date this quote?) John Milton: This thought might lead me through the world's vain MASK. * (obsolete) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters. * (architecture) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron. * (fortification) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere. * (fortification) A screen for a battery * (zoology) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ. * (Puebloan, anthropology) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.) * (computing, programming) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask. * (computer graphics) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image. HYPONYMS * (a cover for the face): domino mask, sleep mask DERIVED TERMS TRANSLATIONS VERB MASK (_third-person singular simple present_ MASKS, _present participle_ MASKING, _simple past and past participle_ MASKED) * (transitive) To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor. * (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare, _Merry Wives of Windsor, IV,vi_: They must all be MASKED and vizarded * (transitive) To disguise; to cover; to hide. * (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare, _Macbeth, III-i_: MASKING the business from the common eye * (transitive, military) To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of. * (transitive, military) To cover or keep in check. _to MASK a body of troops or a fortess by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out_ * (intransitive) To take part as a masker in a masquerade (Can we find

From Middle French masque (a covering to hide or protect the face), from Italian maschera (mask, disguise), from Medieval Latin masca, mascha, mascus (mask, nightmare, ghost), of uncertain origin. Replaced Old English grīma (mask).

Medieval Latin masca, mascha, mascus may represent the merger of two or more words: 1). a Germanic word from Old Frankish *maska, *maskra ("mask, mesh"; compare Old English mæscre (mesh; discoloration, spot), Old English masc (net, mesh netting), Old High German māsca (mesh, ties)), from Proto-Germanic *maskwǭ (mesh, mask), from Proto-Indo-European *mezgʷ- (to knit, twist), from the practice of wearing mesh netting over the face as a mask to filter air, keeping soot and dust particles from entering the lungs (compare surgical mask, gas mask, etc.); 2). Old French mascurer ("to blacken (the face)"; compare Occitan mascarar, Catalan mascarar), from a stem *maska, *mask- (black) believed to be of Pre-Indo-European origin giving rise to words meaning "witch, wizard, sorcerer" (compare Old Provençal masco (witch), Occitan masca (witch), French masque (brothel-keeper, witch)); and perhaps another 3). from Arabic مسخرة (maskhara(t), buffoon, fool, pleasantry, anything ridiculous), from سخرة (sakhira, to ridicule, to laugh at).

Alternative forms

Noun

mask (plural masks)

  1. A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection.
    a dancer's mask; a fencer's mask; a ball player's mask
  2. That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.
  3. A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.
  5. (architecture) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.
  6. (fortification) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.
  7. (fortification) A screen for a battery
  8. (zoology) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.
  9. (Puebloan, anthropology) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.)
  10. (computing, programming) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask.
  11. (computer graphics) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

mask (third-person singular simple present masks, present participle masking, simple past and past participle masked)

  1. (transitive) To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor.
  2. (transitive) To disguise; to cover; to hide.
  3. (transitive, military) To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of.
  4. (transitive, military) To cover or keep in check.
    to mask a body of troops or a fortess by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out
  5. (intransitive) To take part as a masker in a masquerade
    (Can we find

English - Etymology 2

From Middle English _maske_, from Old English _max_, _*masc_ (“net”), from Proto-Germanic _*maskwǭ_ (“mesh, netting, mask”), from Proto-Indo-European _*mozgʷ-_, _*mezgʷ-_ (“to knit, tie”). Cognate with Dutch _maas_ (“mesh”), German _Masche_ (“mesh”), Icelandic _möskvi_ (“mesh”). NOUN MASK (_plural_ MASKS) * A mesh. * (UK dialectal, Scotland) The mesh of a net; a net; net-bag.

From Middle English maske, from Old English max, *masc (net), from Proto-Germanic *maskwǭ (mesh, netting, mask), from Proto-Indo-European *mozgʷ-, *mezgʷ- (to knit, tie). Cognate with Dutch maas (mesh), German Masche (mesh), Icelandic möskvi (mesh).

Noun

mask (plural masks)

  1. A mesh.
  2. (UK dialectal, Scotland) The mesh of a net; a net; net-bag.

Какие в категорииENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 3
Информация о предмете

English - Etymology 3

From Middle English _*mask_, _masch_, from Old English _māx_, _māsc_ (“mash”). More at mash. NOUN MASK (_plural_ MASKS) * (UK dialectal) Mash. VERB MASK (_third-person singular simple present_ MASKS, _present participle_ MASKING, _simple past and past participle_ MASKED) * (transitive, UK dialectal) To mash. * (transitive, UK dialectal) (brewing) To mix malt with hot water to yield wort. * (UK dialectal, Scotland) To prepare tea in a teapot; alternative to brew.

From Middle English *mask, masch, from Old English māx, māsc (mash). More at mash.

Noun

mask (plural masks)

  1. (UK dialectal) Mash.

Verb

mask (third-person singular simple present masks, present participle masking, simple past and past participle masked)

  1. (transitive, UK dialectal) To mash.
  2. (transitive, UK dialectal) (brewing) To mix malt with hot water to yield wort.
  3. (UK dialectal, Scotland) To prepare tea in a teapot; alternative to brew.

Какие в категорииENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 4
Информация о предмете

English - Etymology 4

From Middle English _masken_, short for _*maskeren_, _malskren_ (“to bewilder; be confused, wander”). More at masker. VERB MASK (_third-person singular simple present_ MASKS, _present participle_ MASKING, _simple past and past participle_ MASKED) * (transitive, UK dialectal) To bewilder; confuse. REFERENCES * ^ Friedrich Kluge, “Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache” , 22. Auflage, 1989, bearbeitet von Elmar Seebold, ISBN 3-11-006800-1

From Middle English masken, short for *maskeren, malskren (to bewilder; be confused, wander). More at masker.

Verb

mask (third-person singular simple present masks, present participle masking, simple past and past participle masked)

  1. (transitive, UK dialectal) To bewilder; confuse.

References

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge, “Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache” , 22. Auflage, 1989, bearbeitet von Elmar Seebold, ISBN 3-11-006800-1

Какие в категорииENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
Информация о предмете

English - Anagrams

* maks

Какие в категорииSWEDISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
Информация о предмете

Swedish - Etymology 1

From Old Norse _maðkr_ (Old Swedish _maþker_). Cognate with English _mawk_, Danish _maddike_ and Finnish _matikka_. PRONUNCIATION NOUN MASK c * worm DECLENSION DERIVED TERMS * daggmask

From Old Norse maðkr (Old Swedish maþker). Cognate with English mawk, Danish maddike and Finnish matikka.

Pronunciation

Noun

mask c

  1. worm
Declension
Derived terms

Какие в категорииSWEDISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Информация о предмете

Swedish - Etymology 2

From French _masque_, from Latin _masca_. Details: see above, _mask_. PRONUNCIATION NOUN MASK c * mask; a cover designed to disguise or protect the face DECLENSION DERIVED TERMS * maskera * maskerad * maskering

From French masque, from Latin masca. Details: see above, mask.

Pronunciation

Noun

mask c

  1. mask; a cover designed to disguise or protect the face
Declension
Derived terms


comments powered by Disqus

Связанных с мемы

Facebook




[X]

Знакомства


Практика ваш английский, встречи с людьми по всему миру

Найти