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absent   
      

It Has 6 letters ( a b s e n t )         2 vowels ( a e )         4 consonants ( b s n t )         Word on the contrary tnesba

Which the in categoryENGLISH - ALTERNATIVE FORMS
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English - Alternative Forms

* abs.

Which the in categoryENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
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English - Etymology 1

* From Middle English _absent_, Middle French _absent_, from Old French _ausent_, and their source, Latin _absens_, present participle of _abesse_ (“to be away from”), from _ab_ (“away”) + _esse_ (“to be”). PRONUNCIATION * (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈæb.sn̩t/ * (US) IPA(key): /ˈæb.sn̩t/, enPR: ăb'sənt ADJECTIVE ABSENT (_comparative_ ABSENTER, _superlative_ ABSENTEST) * (not comparable) Being away from a place; withdrawn from a place; not present; missing. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.] * 1623, William Shakespeare, _All’s Well That Ends Well, II-iii_ Expecting ABSENT friends. * (not comparable) Not existing; lacking. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.] _The part was rudimental or ABSENT._ * (sometimes comparable) Inattentive to what is passing; absent-minded; preoccupied. [First attested in the early 18th century.] * 1746-1747, Chesterfield, _Letters to his Son_ What is commonly called an ABSENT man is commonly either a very weak or a very affected man. ANTONYMS * present RELATED TERMS * absence * absentee * absenteeism TRANSLATIONS NOUN ABSENT (_plural_ ABSENTS) * (obsolete) Absentee; a person who is away on occasion. [Attested from around 1350 to 1470 until the early 19th century.] PREPOSITION ABSENT * (law) In the absence of; without. [First attested in the mid 20th century.] * 1919, State vs. Britt, Supreme Court of Missouri, Division 2, in _The Southwestern Reporter_, page 427 If the accused refuse upon demand to pay money or deliver property (ABSENT any excuse or excusing circumstance) which came into his hands as a bailee, such refusal might well constitute some evidence of conversion, with the requisite fraudulent intent required by the statute. * 2011, David Elstein, letter, _London Review of Books_, XXXIII.15: the Princess Caroline case [...] established that – ABSENT a measurable ‘public interest’ in publication – she was safe from being photographed while out shopping. TRANSLATIONS

Pronunciation

Adjective

absent (comparative absenter, superlative absentest)

  1. (not comparable) Being away from a place; withdrawn from a place; not present; missing. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
  2. (not comparable) Not existing; lacking. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
    The part was rudimental or absent.
  3. (sometimes comparable) Inattentive to what is passing; absent-minded; preoccupied. [First attested in the early 18th century.]
Antonyms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

absent (plural absents)

  1. (obsolete) Absentee; a person who is away on occasion. [Attested from around 1350 to 1470 until the early 19th century.]

Preposition

absent

  1. (law) In the absence of; without. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]
Translations

Which the in categoryENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Information about the subject

English - Etymology 2

From Old French _absenter_, from Late Latin _absentare_ (“keep away, be away”). PRONUNCIATION * (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /æbˈsɛnt/, enPR: ăbsĕnt' * (US) IPA(key): /æbˈsɛnt/ VERB ABSENT (_third-person singular simple present_ ABSENTS, _present participle_ ABSENTING, _simple past and past participle_ ABSENTED) * (transitive, now reflexive) Keep away; stay away; go away. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.] * 1674, John Milton, _Paradise Lost_, Second Edition, Book IX Go; for thy stay, not free, ABSENTS thee more; * 1701-1703, Addison, "Remarks on Italy" If after due summons any member ABSENTS himself, he is to be fined. * 1945, George Orwell, _Animal Farm_, chapter 6 This work was strictly voluntary, but any animal who ABSENTED himself from it would have his rations reduced by half. * (intransitive, obsolete) Stay away; withdraw. [Attested from around 1350 to 1470 until the late 18th century.] * (transitive, rare) Leave. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.] TRANSLATIONS

From Old French absenter, from Late Latin absentare (keep away, be away).

Pronunciation

Verb

absent (third-person singular simple present absents, present participle absenting, simple past and past participle absented)

  1. (transitive, now reflexive) Keep away; stay away; go away. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) Stay away; withdraw. [Attested from around 1350 to 1470 until the late 18th century.]
  3. (transitive, rare) Leave. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
Translations

Which the in categoryENGLISH - ANAGRAMS
Information about the subject

English - Anagrams

* abnets

Which the in categoryENGLISH - REFERENCES
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English - References

* ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), _Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged_ (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 6 * ↑ 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Lesley Brown (editor), _The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary_, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 8

  1. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 6
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 8

Which the in categoryCATALAN - ETYMOLOGY
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Catalan - Etymology

Borrowed from Latin _absēns_, _absēntem_.

Borrowed from Latin absēns, absēntem.

Which the in categoryCATALAN - ADJECTIVE
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Catalan - Adjective

ABSENT m, f (_masculine and feminine plural_ ABSENTS) * absent RELATED TERMS * absència

absent m, f (masculine and feminine plural absents)

  1. absent

Related terms

Which the in categoryFRENCH - ETYMOLOGY
Information about the subject

French - Etymology

Borrowed from Latin _absēns_, _absēntem_. Compare the popular form _ausent_.

Borrowed from Latin absēns, absēntem. Compare the popular form ausent.

Which the in categoryFRENCH - PRONUNCIATION
Information about the subject

French - Pronunciation

* IPA(key): /apsɑ̃/

  • IPA(key): /apsɑ̃/

Which the in categoryFRENCH - ADJECTIVE
Information about the subject

French - Adjective

ABSENT m (_feminine_ ABSENTE, _masculine plural_ ABSENTS, _feminine plural_ ABSENTES) * absent * absent-minded RELATED TERMS * absence

absent m (feminine absente, masculine plural absents, feminine plural absentes)

  1. absent
  2. absent-minded

Related terms

Which the in categoryFRENCH - NOUN
Information about the subject

French - Noun

ABSENT m (_plural_ ABSENTS) * absentee; missing person

absent m (plural absents)

  1. absentee; missing person

Which the in categoryFRENCH - ANAGRAMS
Information about the subject

French - Anagrams

* basent

Which the in categoryFRENCH - EXTERNAL LINKS
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French - External Links

* “absent” in _le Trésor de la langue française informatisé_ (_The Digitized Treasury of the French Language_).

Which the in categoryJÈRRIAIS - ETYMOLOGY
Information about the subject

Jèrriais - Etymology

From Old French _ausent_, relatinized on the model of its ancestor, Latin _absēns_ (“absent, missing”), present active participle of _absum, abesse_ (“be away, be absent”).

From Old French ausent, relatinized on the model of its ancestor, Latin absēns (absent, missing), present active participle of absum, abesse (be away, be absent).

Which the in categoryJÈRRIAIS - ADJECTIVE
Information about the subject

Jèrriais - Adjective

ABSENT m (_feminine_ ABSENTE, _masculine plural_ ABSENTS, _feminine plural_ ABSENTES) * absent DERIVED TERMS * absemment (“absently”)

absent m (feminine absente, masculine plural absents, feminine plural absentes)

  1. absent

Derived terms

Which the in categoryROMANIAN - ETYMOLOGY
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Romanian - Etymology

From French _absent_, Latin _absēns_, _absēntem_.

From French absent, Latin absēns, absēntem.

Which the in categoryROMANIAN - ADJECTIVE
Information about the subject

Romanian - Adjective

ABSENT * absent RELATED TERMS * absenta * absentare * absentat * absenteism * absenteist * absență

absent

  1. absent

Related terms


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