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compound   
      

It Has 8 letters ( c o m p o u n d )         3 vowels ( o o u )         5 consonants ( c m p n d )         Word on the contrary dnuopmoc

Which the in categoryENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 1
Information about the subject

English - Etymology 1

Possibly from Malay _kampong_, _kampung_ (“group of buildings, village”), via Dutch or Portuguese . PRONUNCIATION * (UK) IPA(key): /kɒmpaʊnd/ * (US) enPR: kŏm'pound, IPA(key): /ˈkɑmpaʊnd/ NOUN COMPOUND (_plural_ COMPOUNDS) * an enclosure within which workers, prisoners, or soldiers are confined * a group of buildings situated close together, e.g. for a school or block of offices SYNONYMS * (enclosure within which workers, prisoners, or soldiers are confined): gaol/jail, pen, pound, prison TRANSLATIONS

Possibly from Malay kampong, kampung (group of buildings, village), via Dutch or Portuguese .

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kɒmpaʊnd/
  • (US) enPR: kŏm'pound, IPA(key): /ˈkɑmpaʊnd/

Noun

compound (plural compounds)

  1. an enclosure within which workers, prisoners, or soldiers are confined
  2. a group of buildings situated close together, e.g. for a school or block of offices
Synonyms
Translations

Which the in categoryENGLISH - ETYMOLOGY 2
Information about the subject

English - Etymology 2

From Middle English _compounen_, from Middle French _componre_, _compondre_ (“to put together”), from Latin _componere_, from Latin _com-_ (“together”) + _ponere_ (“to put”). PRONUNCIATION * adj. and noun (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmpaʊnd/ * adj. and noun (US) enPR: kŏm'pound, IPA(key): /ˈkɑmpaʊnd/ * verb (US, UK) enPR: kəmpound', IPA(key): /kəmˈpaʊnd/ * Rhymes: -aʊnd ADJECTIVE COMPOUND (_not comparable_) * composed of elements; not simple _a COMPOUND word_ * I. Watts COMPOUND substances are made up of two or more simple substances. * (music) An octave higher than originally (i.e. a compound major second is equivalent to a major ninth). SYNONYMS * (composed of elements): composite ANTONYMS * (composed of elements): simple DERIVED TERMS * compound chocolate * compound interest TRANSLATIONS NOUN COMPOUND (_plural_ COMPOUNDS) * Anything made by combining several things. * (chemistry, dated) A substance made from any combination elements. * (chemistry) A substance formed by chemical union of two or more ingredients in definite proportions by weight. * (linguistics) A lexeme that consists of more than one stem; compound word; for example _laptop_, formed from _lap_ and _top_. SYNONYMS * (anything made by combining several things): amalgam, blend, combination, composite, mix, mixture * (word): compound word HYPONYMS * (word): closed compound * (word): hyphenated compound * (word): open compound TRANSLATIONS VERB COMPOUND (_third-person singular simple present_ COMPOUNDS, _present participle_ COMPOUNDING, _simple past and past participle_ COMPOUNDED) * (transitive) To form (a resulting mixture) by combining different elements, ingredients, or parts. _to COMPOUND a medicine_ * Sir Walter Scott incapacitating him from successfully COMPOUNDING a tale of this sort * (transitive) To assemble (ingredients) into a whole; to combine, mix, or unite. * Addison We have the power of altering and COMPOUNDING those images into all the varieties of picture. * (transitive) To modify or change by combination with some other thing or part; to mingle with something else. * Shakespeare Only COMPOUND me with forgotten dust. * (transitive, law) To settle by agreeing on less than the claim, or on different terms than those stipulated. _to COMPOUND a debt_ * (transitive) To settle amicably; to adjust by agreement; to compromise. * Shakespeare I pray, my lords, let me COMPOUND this strife. * (intransitive) To come to terms of agreement; to agree; to settle by a compromise; usually followed by _with_ before the person participating, and _for_ before the thing compounded or the consideration. * Shakespeare Here's a fellow will help you to-morrow; […] COMPOUND with him by the year. * Clarendon They were at last glad to COMPOUND for his bare commitment to the Tower. * R. Carew Cornwall COMPOUNDED to furnish ten oxen after Michaelmas for thirty pounds. * _Hudibras_ COMPOUND for sins they are inclined to / By damning those they have no mind to. * (transitive, obsolete) To compose; to constitute. * Shakespeare his pomp and all what state COMPOUNDS * (transitive) To worsen a situation or thing state * New Family Structure Study This problem is compounded when these studies compare data from the small convenience samples of gay parenting with data on heterosexual parenting SYNONYMS * (to come to terms of agreement): agree * (to put together): assemble, blend, combine, join, join together, mix, put together, unite * (to add to): augment, increase * (law: to settle by agreeing on less than the claim): settle DERIVED TERMS * compoundable TRANSLATIONS

From Middle English compounen, from Middle French componre, compondre (to put together), from Latin componere, from Latin com- (together) + ponere (to put).

Pronunciation

Adjective

compound (not comparable)

  1. composed of elements; not simple
    a compound word
  2. (music) An octave higher than originally (i.e. a compound major second is equivalent to a major ninth).
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

compound (plural compounds)

  1. Anything made by combining several things.
  2. (chemistry, dated) A substance made from any combination elements.
  3. (chemistry) A substance formed by chemical union of two or more ingredients in definite proportions by weight.
  4. (linguistics) A lexeme that consists of more than one stem; compound word; for example laptop, formed from lap and top.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
Translations

Verb

compound (third-person singular simple present compounds, present participle compounding, simple past and past participle compounded)

  1. (transitive) To form (a resulting mixture) by combining different elements, ingredients, or parts.
    to compound a medicine
  2. (transitive) To assemble (ingredients) into a whole; to combine, mix, or unite.
  3. (transitive) To modify or change by combination with some other thing or part; to mingle with something else.
  4. (transitive, law) To settle by agreeing on less than the claim, or on different terms than those stipulated.
    to compound a debt
  5. (transitive) To settle amicably; to adjust by agreement; to compromise.
  6. (intransitive) To come to terms of agreement; to agree; to settle by a compromise; usually followed by with before the person participating, and for before the thing compounded or the consideration.
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To compose; to constitute.
  8. (transitive) To worsen a situation or thing state
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Which the in categoryENGLISH - REFERENCES
Information about the subject

English - References

* ^ “compound” in Douglas Harper, _Online Etymology Dictionary_ (2001).

  1. ^ “compound” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Which the in categoryENGLISH - EXTERNAL LINKS
Information about the subject

English - External Links

* COMPOUND in the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica.


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